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The story of Frankenstein's monster continues... In the Arctic waters of the Barents Sea, the creature has taken the ultimate revenge on his creator, Frankenstein. He travels south, where a chance meeting with a witch gives him the opportunity to overcome what he is, and perhaps become who he was meant to be. Transformed into a normal-looking man, but retaining his superhuThe story of Frankenstein's monster continues... In the Arctic waters of the Barents Sea, the creature has taken the ultimate revenge on his creator, Frankenstein. He travels south, where a chance meeting with a witch gives him the opportunity to overcome what he is, and perhaps become who he was meant to be. Transformed into a normal-looking man, but retaining his superhuman strength, the creature journeys to Moscow, where he becomes the protege of a wealthy natural philosopher and the lover of his daughter, Sabrina. Taking the name Viktor Suvorin, the creature wins acclaim as a military hero while Napoleon rages across Europe. Following the wars, Viktor and Sabrina travel to Switzerland, where they meet Byron, Percy Shelley, and Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley, who bases her novel on Viktor's memoirs. Viktor faces a final challenge to his hard-won humanity when tragedy strikes his family and he returns to the Arctic. There, on a frozen sea under the shimmering Northern Lights, the creature must confront the meaning of his creation and his life. ..". a compelling, thought-provoking novel with an undercurrent that made me always a little anxious about what will happen next to the characters." Camellia, Long and Short Reviews "This wonderfully written novel will have any reader hooked right from the beginning. It is an enjoyable and extraordinary story! I hope this will not be the last we see of this author, who obviously has a wonderful talent." Ann Marie Chalmers, Front Street Reviews"...

Title : Confessions of the Creature
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781611792096
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 314 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Confessions of the Creature Reviews

  • Marita
    2019-02-12 04:08

    4.5 starsWhat if? What if the Creature, after Frankenstein's death, found a little old granny in a Russian forest who would bequeath him a more human appearance? What if he is given a chance at a normal, human life? What would he do with his life? Who does he become?In his debut novel Gary Inbinder takes up Mary Shelley's story of Frankenstein's creature after the death of Frankenstein. Frankenstein was dead, but “I lived on in the hell he created for me.” Finding himself in the frozen wasteland north of Archangel, Russia, he survives as best he can until he has a strange encounter with an old woman who doesn't seem to fear him at all. From this point his life changes dramatically. The creature travels to Moscow, takes on the name Viktor Viktorovich and becomes the protégé of the natural philosopher Suvorin. We discover that Viktor is a complex character. More about this as well as the main theme of the novel later, but in spoiler tags. In fact, most of my analysis is between these tags.Read about Viktor, now Viktor Suvorin, as he becomes involved in the Napoleonic Wars (a good bit of history here and nicely researched), and travel with him through Europe. You'll meet some people you probably already know, and there are some lovely surprises. As we accompany Viktor, we gain insights into his life and being.(view spoiler)[The main theme of the novel is redemption through love. Viktor speaks French, he speaks Russian. “I had access to Suvorin’s library, where I deepened my knowledge and appreciation of languages, literature, history, art, music, and philosophy. I also received instruction in the rules and conventions of society.” He is well read, yes, he has even read Mary Wollstonecraft's* famous book, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (:D) But is the culture but a veneer? What lurks within his now normal human countenance? He becomes the protégé of Suvorin who finds him a job in the army and Viktor and Suvorin's daughter Elizabeth**, better known as Sabrina, become an item. But would Sabrina have accepted Victor had she known about his origin, would she have loved him unconditionally and helped him or would she have fled in terror and disgust?We follow him through the Napoleonic wars where he distinguishes himself, earning promotions and medals. Although he initially despised aristocrats, he becomes one himself. No matter how successful he becomes, he always doubts himself: “I’d traveled a long road from Frankenstein’s laboratory, the Bavarian woods, the mountains, the frozen arctic wastes, Agrafina’s woodshed, and a peasant village. It had been an uphill climb, and I sometimes wondered if I, like Bonaparte, was destined for a great fall”. Time and time again he has to struggle with the beast within and he constantly worries that his other self might surface. He is also concerned that the creature might manifest itself in his offspring. It is these doubts that make Viktor so "human". There are further challenges when others discuss Frankenstein and his creature and he has to remain deadpan. He eventually has to face his ultimate challenge in Lapland where he will learn the most important lesson of his life. He who did not know what love was, now understands its transforming power.Both Vostokov and Count Vorontsof have their own inner demons, but do they have the resources to overcome them? Viktor's story becomes a metaphor for man's struggle with that which lies within.Viktor also visits Lake Geneva in Switzerland where he meets Mary Godwin, Percy Shelley and Lord Byron. Sometime later in Italy he meets up with Mary, now Mary Shelley, after the publication of her novel Frankenstein. At this meeting they discuss the theme of love and redemption and of Mary's novel 'Frankenstein' vs Percy Shelley's poem 'Promethius Unbound' which was due for publication in the near future. I loved the interlude with the Romantic poets and the way that the story goes full circle. There are other interesting aspects to the plot and much else that I could quote, but enough said.######*Mary Wollstonecraft was Mary Shelley's mother.**Elizabeth was the name of Frankenstein's bride. (hide spoiler)]I should like to emphasise that my rating is based on the quality of the novel and the enjoyment I derived from reading it, and not due to the fact that Gary is a GR friend.Gary has subsequently written two other novels:The Flower to the Painter reviewed here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show... andThe Devil in Montmartre: A Mystery in Fin de Siècle Pariswhich I reviewed here: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...

  • SenoraG
    2019-02-10 01:16

    This was an absolutely amazing book! I have always liked Frankenstein and felt so sorry for the monster. In this book he gets a second chance, a chance to be a normal person with friends, career, family, etc. The writing was great and the narrator was even better. I honestly think this would be better listened to then read. IMO it would not have touched me the way it did if I didnt hear it.This has become one of my favorite books and I will look for more by this author.

  • Angela
    2019-01-23 07:34

    It's a challenge and a half to try to write a sequel to no less august a book than Frankenstein, and for that alone, I must give my fellow Drollerie author Gary Inbinder props. I'm also pleased to say that although there were parts of the book that didn't work as much for me, by and large, I feel he did an excellent job at his appointed task!The opening of the book does ask you to accept the idea that sorcery of a kind exists in the Frankenstein universe, since the entire plot only gets underway when the monster, fresh from killing his creator, is taken in by an old Russian witch. In repayment for his working for her, she grants him his greatest wish: to be human and to be able to have a real life of his own. If you're used to the version of the Frankenstein story more popularly depicted in the movies, the presence of magic may be jarring; however, my spouse pointed out quite correctly that the original story does heavily pursue the idea that Victor Frankenstein was dabbling as much in black magic as he was forbidden science in creating his monster. So it's not too much of a stretch for me to allow for actual magic existing in this world.But. This is really only the start of the plot, and the greatest portion of it by far is taken up by the creature--now calling himself Viktor Viktorovich--not only winning himself a life and a family in Russia, but achieving a meteoric rise to power. In fact, the vast majority of the plot is taken up with his participation in the wars against Napoleon. For me as a reader this had quite a bit of interest, but the real heart of the story doesn't come until the final third, when the truth of Viktor's origins begins to come back to haunt him.And this is also where the story ultimately let me down a bit, since I was expecting more creepiness than I actually got, and one plot device in particular that was used as part of Frankenstein's backstory struck me as quite unnecessary. But that said, overall I did find this a gripping read, and it's worth checking out if you liked the original. Four stars.

  • Angela
    2019-01-22 02:15

    It's a challenge and a half to try to write a sequel to no less august a book than Frankenstein, and for that alone, I must give my fellow Drollerie author Gary Inbinder props. I'm also pleased to say that although there were parts of the book that didn't work as much for me, by and large, I feel he did an excellent job at his appointed task!The opening of the book does ask you to accept the idea that sorcery of a kind exists in the Frankenstein universe, since the entire plot only gets underway when the monster, fresh from killing his creator, is taken in by an old Russian witch. In repayment for his working for her, she grants him his greatest wish: to be human and to be able to have a real life of his own. If you're used to the version of the Frankenstein story more popularly depicted in the movies, the presence of magic may be jarring; however, my spouse pointed out quite correctly that the original story does heavily pursue the idea that Victor Frankenstein was dabbling as much in black magic as he was forbidden science in creating his monster. So it's not too much of a stretch for me to allow for actual magic existing in this world.But. This is really only the start of the plot, and the greatest portion of it by far is taken up by the creature--now calling himself Viktor Viktorovich--not only winning himself a life and a family in Russia, but achieving a meteoric rise to power. In fact, the vast majority of the plot is taken up with his participation in the wars against Napoleon. For me as a reader this had quite a bit of interest, but the real heart of the story doesn't come until the final third, when the truth of Viktor's origins begins to come back to haunt him.And this is also where the story ultimately let me down a bit, since I was expecting more creepiness than I actually got, and one plot device in particular that was used as part of Frankenstein's backstory struck me as quite unnecessary. But that said, overall I did find this a gripping read, and it's worth checking out if you liked the original. Four stars.

  • Arleigh
    2019-01-29 05:16

    Frankenstein’s creature is given a new voice and a fresh start in this continuation of Mary Shelley’s classic. Journeying from the Arctic, he happens upon a desolate cottage in the wilds of Russia and meets a pagan healer who turns his features from monstrous to handsome and foretells his rise to greatness. Styling himself Viktor Viktorovich—a strange tribute to his creator—he joins the ranks of a group of village laborers outside of Moscow.Extremely strong, intelligent and cultured Viktor quickly rises from peasant to high-ranking officer during the Napoleonic Wars. He falls in love with the beautiful daughter of his commander and leads a life he never thought possible—but lurking within, with yellow eyes and sickly skin, the creature struggles to emerge. Plagued with frightful dreams and visions, there is a constant battle between the malicious monster and the honorable man, ultimately surfacing in a spellbinding and satisfying conclusion.As a historical novel, it captures early 19th-century Russian society from the perspective of several different classes, wisely expounding on the virtues and the vices of mankind through the eyes of a monster turned human. The Napoleonic Wars are detailed superbly, but not so thoroughly as to disinterest those not inclined toward war novels. There is a romantic theme and plenty of philosophical anecdotes to satiate lovers of those genres. Even readers unfamiliar with the classic will enjoy this novel for its well-developed characterizations, intricate plot, and imaginative and original prose.Reviewed for Historical Novels Review magazine.

  • Linda
    2019-01-28 01:30

    "Confessions of the Creature" is a literary story in the fine tradition of gothic novels. The story is told from the point of view of Frankenstein's creature, and is the perfect sequel to Mary Godwin Shelley's Frankenstein. Fans of gothic and romantic historical fiction will love the setting, the conversation, the tension and conflict.The story takes place largely in Russia, during and after the Napoleonic wars. The creature, who has ironically taken the name Victor, is helped by a good witch who slightly transforms him, allowing him to blend into society. Through a chain of events Victor becomes a gentleman, falls in love, and serves as an officer in the Russian cavalry where he rises to prominence. The author provides an ironic cameo appearance of the Shelleys. There is love, loss, joy and tragedy in the novel, which ultimately is a story about love and redemption.The author's knowledge of historical detail, of culture, of geography is evident throughout, adding verisimilitude and sensual pleasure for the reader. Highly recommended for readers of gothic and 19th century-style historical fiction.

  • Linda
    2019-02-05 00:34

    Confessions of the Creature" is a literary story in the fine tradition of gothic novels. The story is told from the point of view of Frankenstein's creature, and is the perfect sequel to Mary Godwin Shelley's Frankenstein. Fans of gothic and romantic historical fiction will love the setting, the conversation, the tension and conflict.The story takes place largely in Russia, during and after the Napoleonic wars. The creature, who has ironically taken the name Victor, is helped by a good witch who slightly transforms him, allowing him to blend into society. Through a chain of events Victor becomes a gentleman, falls in love, and serves as an officer in the Russian cavalry where he rises to prominence. The author provides an ironic cameo appearance of the Shelleys. There is love, loss, joy and tragedy in the novel, which ultimately is a story about love and redemption.The author's knowledge of historical detail, of culture, of geography is evident throughout, adding verisimilitude and sensual pleasure for the reader. Highly recommended for readers of gothic and 19th century-style historical fiction.

  • V.E. Ulett
    2019-02-14 02:04

    Set in Russia in the early nineteenth century during the time of the French Revolution and the long European war that followed, Confessions of the Creature is the story of the being created by Frankenstein, of Mary Shelley's famous tale. After taking his revenge upon Frankenstein the creature wanders out of the frozen Arctic into Russia. A peasant mystic transforms the creature's face and he takes on the name of his creator. Viktor Viktorovich makes his way to Moscow and enters the society of men.Viktor Viktorovich marries into a military family, and with his superior strength and endurance, he distinguishes himself in battle. Russia came in and out of the long war with Napoleon, and a fascinating part of the novel consists of Viktor's war journal. The flight of the French Grand Armee from Russia, and the pursuit by the Russian Imperial Army reminds Viktor, “of my vicious, unrelenting struggle with Frankenstein.” Though Confessions of the Creature takes its departure from Mary Shelley's tale, this is a thoroughly unique story of war, Russian society in the Napoleonic age, and a man's search for his place in the world and what it means to be human.

  • Linda
    2019-02-15 04:26

    "Confessions of the Creature" is a literary story in the fine tradition of gothic novels. The story is told from the point of view of Frankenstein's creature, and is the perfect sequel to Mary Godwin Shelley's Frankenstein. Fans of gothic and romantic historical fiction will love the setting, the conversation, the tension and conflict.The story takes place largely in Russia, during and after the Napoleonic wars. The creature, who has ironically taken the name Victor, is helped by a good witch who slightly transforms him, allowing him to blend into society. Through a chain of events Victor becomes a gentleman, falls in love, and serves as an officer in the Russian cavalry where he rises to prominence. The author provides an ironic cameo appearance of the Shelleys. There is love, loss, joy and tragedy in the novel, which ultimately is a story about love and redemption.The author's knowledge of historical detail, of culture, of geography is evident throughout, adding verisimilitude and sensual pleasure for the reader. Highly recommended for readers of gothic and 19th century-style historical fiction.

  • Gary Inbinder
    2019-02-15 00:26