Read From Ghetto to Death Camp: A Memoir of Privilege and Luck by Timothy Braatz Anatol Chari Online

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When German soldiers invaded the Polish city of Lodz at the start of World War II, they confined the local Jewish community to a miserable, overcrowded ghetto. Through family connections, a Jewish teenager named Anatol Chari (far left in photo) became a ghetto policeman. Because they were sometimes viewed as collaborators, ghetto policemen who survived the war kept their pWhen German soldiers invaded the Polish city of Lodz at the start of World War II, they confined the local Jewish community to a miserable, overcrowded ghetto. Through family connections, a Jewish teenager named Anatol Chari (far left in photo) became a ghetto policeman. Because they were sometimes viewed as collaborators, ghetto policemen who survived the war kept their past a secret. In From Ghetto to Death Camp, Chari reveals that hidden story, describing the policemen's duties-guarding food, rounding up prisoners for transport-and the privileges it brought them. Those privileges ended when the ghetto population was transported to Auschwitz. As a slave laborer, Chari went on to various work camps, endured long marches and an Allied bombing raid, and ended up in the Bergen-Belsen death camp. To survive the camps, he now says, you needed help, smarts, and most of all luck. He depicts a seemingly senseless world where guards could be decent or cruel, where some prisoners were sent to hospitals and others to gas chambers, and where food was everything. Written with remarkable honesty and unexpected wit, this unique memoir is in many ways a reflection on the human condition....

Title : From Ghetto to Death Camp: A Memoir of Privilege and Luck
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780615560724
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 188 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

From Ghetto to Death Camp: A Memoir of Privilege and Luck Reviews

  • Melissa
    2019-04-18 13:29

    I was a little scared to start reading this...a holocaust book written by a survivor...I knew it would be emotional. Once I started, I had a hard time putting the book down. I had read a few reviews before reading that were negative towards the author saying how dare he...he had it easy (my paraphrase of the reviews)...I say, If you think what he went through was "easy" you didn't read the book. Yes, the author had it better than most...but living through the Ghetto and Death Camps was not easy. Yes, he had some privilege but it didn't come without a cost. Each survivors story is a true miracle whether they had it "easy" or not. I am grateful that we have an opportunity to read these stories of survival and hope.

  • Theresa
    2019-04-15 12:27

    Another heartwrenching WWII story. I think all children today should read a book about the death camps. It is truly unbelievable. This book centered more on the struggle for food by a Jew who had some connections that helped him throughout the war.

  • Steve
    2019-04-13 15:32

    An amazing story of survival by a Jewish Pole from the ghetto in Poland during World War II. Who was transported by the Nazis to Auschwitz and survived despite the cruel treatment.

  • Kenton Crowther
    2019-04-17 15:45

    Chari was a ghetto policeman in Lodz--which in this book is spelt Aodz--then Auschwitz and Kaldwasser, amongst other camps.He considers he was privileged in the ghetto; being his father's son helped him with the ghetto 'elder' Rumkowski and other Jewish officials who sometimes had their people's lives in their hands to give or withhold.The book is easy to read, the cool street languagebeing the contribution perhaps of Timothy Braatz, withwhom Tolek shared his story.In a down-to-earth way you learn how it was, being a Jewamong the Nazis. A world in which an indoor job such as potato peeler can mean you survive for a little longer than most of your fellows.Chari, while being so matter of fact, also had dreams that told the future. Sometimes there seems no reason for it, sometimes he interprets the dreams wrongly-- such as when in the ghetto he dreamt of being with a friend and they were wearing pyjamas and peeling potatoes. To him this seemed to mean they would escape the misery of the ghetto. This was true, but it was in Auschwitz later that the dream was realized--the 'pyjamas' were the striped uniforms of the camp.He says the 3 things needed in the camps were:smarts, help-and luck.Anatol 'Lolek' Chari insists at times that some SS Officers were decent individuals, while some Jewish prisoners were evil. Though there is certainly plenty of Nazi cruelty evidenced in the book. A moving work that shakes up yoursense of what it is to be a human.

  • Jan Peterson
    2019-04-20 19:44

    This is an interesting book because the Jewish policemen were almost as hated as the Germans. Chari's point of view is that everyone had to do something unethical to survive in the concentration camps, but I do not believe this. I think he is trying to justify his role in the ghetto. I do believe that many people survived from pure luck, which is evident in his time in the ghetto and the camps. However, anyone who survived the Holocaust did so by taking risks, caring for themselves or close loved ones. I don't believe, from all the memoirs I have read, that all people did unethical or immoral things to survive. They were treated as animals and often were reduced to acting like animals. I'm not sure that I believe Chari innocent of persecuting his own Jewish people.

  • Sharon
    2019-04-05 11:23

    This is the most positive book I have ever read about the Holocaust, Anatol Chari in no way excuses the atrocities, he tells his story in a "It is what it is" manner.When reading of the Holocaust it is difficult to remember that there are good and bad in ALL people,Mr. Chari never forgot that,I admire him and I'm grateful Timothy Braatz was able to record his story.

  • Martha
    2019-04-01 15:22

    good book

  • KarenFiandaca
    2019-03-25 19:29

    A fascinating look at the Holocaust from a slightly different perspective of a survivor who says he tells it like it really was and what it took to survive.