Read Child Made of Sand: Poems by Thomas Lux Online

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Reader’s familiar with Thomas Lux’s quick-witted images ("Language without simile is like a lung/ without air") and his rambunctious, Cirque-Du-Soleil-like imagination ("The Under-Appreciated Pontooniers") will find in his new collection, Child Made of Sand, not only the signature funny, provocative, and poignant super-surrealism that has made him, along with Charles SimicReader’s familiar with Thomas Lux’s quick-witted images ("Language without simile is like a lung/ without air") and his rambunctious, Cirque-Du-Soleil-like imagination ("The Under-Appreciated Pontooniers") will find in his new collection, Child Made of Sand, not only the signature funny, provocative, and poignant super-surrealism that has made him, along with Charles Simic, James Tate, and Dean Young, one of America’s most inventive and humane poets, but they will also find in a surprising series of homages, elegies, rants, and autobiographical poems a new register of language in which time and mortality echo and reverberate in quieter notes. In "West Shining Tree," we can hear this shift in register when he asks: "I’ll head dead West and ask of all I see:/ Which is the way, the long or the short way,/ to the West Shining Tree?"...

Title : Child Made of Sand: Poems
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780547580982
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 80 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Child Made of Sand: Poems Reviews

  • Diane Kistner
    2019-03-26 10:46

    I don't quite know what to make of this book. I'm not sure if Lux is waxing at times academic or just making fun of academics (I'm fine with that); if he takes himself (and other poets) seriously or not; or if he's gotten a little too comfortable with his famous surrealist, dashed-off style. I found these lines from "A Delivery of Dung" (italics not represented here) to be pretty revealing:Wordsworth the Elderobtained a sinecure selling stamps,wrote many bad poems,lived a long, honorable life, and,truth is, he is immortal,or as close as a corpse can get, would beimmortal for the first four stanzas of "Intimations"alone. Those stanzas alone.Anonymous—"Western Wind"—achieved the same with four lines!No piece of art is perfect.All it has to do is stay around.In "Scriptus Interruptus"—a glimpse into Lux's modus operandi, perhaps, or maybe it's a jab at those who think taking MFA classes can magically make someone into a poet—Lux gives us a clue about how to approach the work:Not too many adjectives, a scantiness of adverbs,those lazy parts of speech, softerthan the thump of a doghit by a dump truck, in fog,two blocks away. But the verbs,when active—talk about dancing!An image here, a simile there,say one thing and mean another.There are plenty of irreverent voices in these pages, such as the wookin' pa nubbish "Madsong" (about "Jebus"), the fist-raised-Tevye questioner in "Every Time Someone Masturbates God Kills a Kitten" ("how about a little less hard-ass"), and the interesting blend of Buddhism and Christianity in "From Whom All Blessings Flow," which concludes:Nobody ever sees Whom around.Whom gets creditfor what Whom never lifted a pinkyto do, or not to do.Whom doesn't have, I don't think, a pinky.Nor do I think Whom would know what to do with itif Whom did.By far my favorite poem in the book is "The Anti-Lunarian League" with an extended metaphor that just won't quit. Had all of the poems in this book been as strong, I would give it a higher rating. Still, the volume is a worthwhile read. As it stands, though, I think the work as a whole is a bit too, well, dashed off.

  • Ruth
    2019-03-29 18:53

    I usually enjoy very much the poems of Thomas Lux so I looked forward to reading this. Even sprung for the hardback. I’m sorry to say I was disappointed. This is no Split Horizon. I still see his wonderful cheeky irreverence, but now they seem to be wearinga cloak of smartassedness. I wanted to like this more than I did.

  • Gerry LaFemina
    2019-03-28 18:32

    Disclaimer: I was a student of Tom's in the 80s and I think his is one of the most unique and interesting voices in American poetry; this book--although lovely and funny and every bit as quirky as some of his previous books, wasn't my favorite of Tom's books (check out God Particles, his previous book, for Lux firing on all cylinders with high-test in the tank), but still this book is up there.