Read 100,000 Hearts: A Surgeon's Memoir by Denton Cooley Online

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Pioneering surgeon Dr. Denton Cooley performed his first human heart transplant in 1968 and astounded the world in 1969 when he was the first surgeon to successfully implant a totally artificial heart in a human being. Over the course of his career, Cooley and his associates have performed thousands of open heart operations and have been forerunners in implementing new surPioneering surgeon Dr. Denton Cooley performed his first human heart transplant in 1968 and astounded the world in 1969 when he was the first surgeon to successfully implant a totally artificial heart in a human being. Over the course of his career, Cooley and his associates have performed thousands of open heart operations and have been forerunners in implementing new surgical procedures. Of all his achievements, however, Cooley is most proud of the Texas Heart Institute, which he founded in 1962 with a mission to use education, research, and improved patient care to decrease the devastating effects of cardiovascular disease. In his new memoir, 100,000 Hearts, Cooley tells about his childhood in Houston and his experiences as a basketball scholarship recipient at the University of Texas. After medical school at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and Johns Hopkins, Cooley served in the Army Medical Corps. While at Johns Hopkins, Cooley assisted in a groundbreaking operation to correct an infant's congenital heart defect, which inspired him to specialize in heart surgery. Cooley's detailed descriptions of what it was like to be in the operating room at crucial points in medical history offer a fascinating perspective on how far medical science has progressed in just a few decades. Dr. Denton Cooley and the Texas Heart Institute are responsible for much of that progress....

Title : 100,000 Hearts: A Surgeon's Memoir
Author :
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ISBN : 9780976669777
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 323 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

100,000 Hearts: A Surgeon's Memoir Reviews

  • Muhammed Hebala
    2019-05-01 08:59

    "The heights by great men reached and kept,were not attained by sudden flight,but they while their companions slept,were toiling upward in the night."What a great memoir. Fascinating."I do think that surgeons may be a little more egotistical than other doctors, perhaps because the public perceives surgery as involving dramatic, often life-or-death situations and surgeons as superheroes. Physicians in other specialties certainly accomplish as much, but the results may not be as immediate or obvious.Combined with good mental and physical skills, excellent training, and solid experience, a strong ego can make the difference between a good surgeon and a great one. When I say ego , I mean a robust self-confidence and deep faith in one's ability to get the job done, whatever the situation. When an unexpected crisis occur, self-confidence can be critical to a surgeon's ability to remain calm and cool, which may make the difference between success and failure. I often tell my trainees, only hilf jokingly, that a successful heart surgeon should be a physician who, when asked to name the three best surgeons in the world, would have trouble naming the other two."During his adulthood he worked in restoring old cars and also worked as a construction worker :)His story with Alfred Blalock, Vivien Thomas and Helen Taussig is inspirational.His discription of the first blue baby operation is MAGNIFICENT.What a life! Being exposed so early in life to the eminent "Lord" Russell Brock and Oswald Tubbs, Sir Clement Price Thomas and Norman Barret. Every single one of them is a giant in medicine.Also his opinions and experience are great."I've often been asked what advice I might give to young surgeons. I've always believed that success in any field starts with desire, persistence, and hard work. Surgery is both an art and a science. It depends on book knowledge and practical skills, as well as good judgment and the ability to handle the unexpected. I learned early in my career that time in the operating room is precious. Even just a few seconds can make the difference between the patient's life and death."A lot of coincidences have happened to him in his life, but his first heart donor was peculiar."Five different neurologists independently examined the donor, and each concluded that her brain could not possibly recover its activity. It was a peculiar coincidence that she was our first heart donor, as I had operated on her for a coarctation of the aorta when she was nine years old."He was a pioneer in heart surgery and a daring person to the extent that he borrowed a special mallet and chisel from a veterans hospital to perform a sternotomy which was not a standard back then.The memoir of a great person should shed some light on his defeats and his insecurities and his tragedies. That is what he describes on arriving Johns Hopkins:"I entered Hopkins with some anxiety because of its world-class reputation. Although people think of me today as very self-confident, there was a time in my life when I fought insecurities at every new step. Whenever I faced an unfamiliar and challenging situation, I had to regain my self-confidence."And his description of his parents' divorce:"After we left home to enter college, Mother and Daddy divorced. Their separation had a lasting impact on me. I wish there had been some way they could have stayed together. I became painfully aware that divorce is a complex thing. In my opinion, neither of my parents ever quite regained their rightful social standing."And his description of his daughter's death is touching:"Florence's death was the worst tragedy of my life. The sadness was overwhelming. Not only do I miss her terribly, but I feel like I failed her. I continue to ask myself whether I could have done more to help her_ maybe somehow treated her differently, so that she wouldn't have taken that final, desperate step. Maybe I just wasn't there enough for her. Her death drew our family even closer, reminding us how dear we are to each other."He touched his patients' hearts, and his memoir touched mine.

  • Betta
    2019-05-14 02:52

    Fascinating review of the life of Dr. Denton A. Cooley, from a childhood during the Depression to establishing the Texas Heart Institute in Houston, Texas. Dr. Cooley explains concisely the experience of being the first surgeon to successfully complete open-heart surgery on a patient and the trials and tribulations to follow. Cardio-thoracic surgery was very different in the 1950s and Dr. Cooley manages to present a very engaging tale for the reader.

  • Aj Baker
    2019-04-22 03:32

    hard to believe he was 90 when he wrote this. I especially enjoyed the beginning of the book when he talked about his upbringing and his time in college.