Read America's War: Talking about the Civil War and Emancipation on their 150th Anniversaries by Edward L. Ayers Online

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America's War: Talking About the Civil War and Emanicipation on Their 150th Anniversaries is co-published by the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities....

Title : America's War: Talking about the Civil War and Emancipation on their 150th Anniversaries
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ISBN : 9780838985809
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 299 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

America's War: Talking about the Civil War and Emancipation on their 150th Anniversaries Reviews

  • Daleb.
    2018-12-29 22:15

    Let's Talk About It: Making Sense of the Civil War A Reading and Discussion program sponsored by the (N.E.H) National Endowment for the Humanities, the Utah Humanities Council, the Fort Douglas Museum, the History Department of Weber State University, and the Weber County Library (I luv my libraries in Ogden, Weber County Utah).Discussions lead by Dr. Branden Little & Dr. Richard Sadler (Weber State University) & held @ the Pleasant Valley Branch of the Weber County Library system, courtesy of Kathryn Pudlock library Manager.Taught in 6 parts: 1)Jan. 18, 2012 Intro by the Dr's and book assignment; 2)Feb. 8, 2012 "March: Geraldine Brooks/America's war: Part 1-Imagining War; 3)Feb. 29, 2012 America's War: Part 2-Choosing Sides; 4)March 21,2012 America's War: Part 3-Making Sense of Shiloh; 5)April 11, 2012 America's War: Part 4-The Shape of War & James M. McPherson's: "Crossroad of Freedom: Antietam"; & 6)April 25, 2012 America's War: Part 5-War and FreedomFri./Sat. Feb. 3/4, 2012: Very interesting reading so far. Setting up the tone of the this class. Can't wait for Wed. to roll around and the discussions to beginxoDaleB.xoThu. Feb. 9, 2012: Part IVery good group discusing/class last night but barely got started on this book as we spent most of the time discussing "March" and talking about events leading up to the Civil War.Should be even better in 3wksxoDaleB.xoMon. Feb. 27, 2012Got to cram a hundred and two pages Plus the whole of the 190 pages of Antietam by James McPherson in before next Wed. @ 7pm.xoDaleB.xoWed. Feb. 29, 2012Once again a great discussion but sooo much to talk about and only an hour and a half to do it all inxoDaleB.xoThur. May 3, 2012Well, I missed all 3 of the last classes for one reason or another, but finally finished the last two sections last week. I enjoyed reading this book and wish i'd have made the last 3 classesWas Sad to have to have turned the books back in and wished i'd had the funds to have bought them and kept themxoDaleB.xo

  • J. Turner
    2018-12-26 18:36

    Great collection. "About the ProgramLet’s Talk About It: Making Sense of the American Civil War is a scholar-led reading and discussion program for public audiences, presented by the ALA Public Programs Office and the National Endowment for the Humanities(NEH).A total of 65 participating libraries will conduct a five-part series of reading and discussion programs, which will take place every two to four weeks, depending on local library preferences. At each session, the conversation will focus on a different facet of the Civil War experience, using one or more common texts as a foundation and touchstone.The reading list includes works of historical fiction and interpretation, speeches, diaries, memoirs, biographies, and short stories. Readings also include an introductory essay, which provides context for the entire Making Sense of the American Civil War series and for each of the five sessions. The essay was written by the national project scholar: Edward L. Ayers, President of the University of Richmond, historian of the American South, and digital history pioneer. Professor Ayers also selected the reading materials and topics of conversation for the program."

  • Don
    2018-12-20 21:22

    Fun collection to read. The book is an anthology of materials, some from the specific period they are talking about (like the Battle of Shiloh}, that will consist of a soldier's diary, the plans of a certain general, and also included remembrances and memoirs written by guys like U.S. Grant and Ambrose Pierce, and even some fiction thrown in for a review of how war affects our imagination. A well done collection, that provides a surprisingly expansive scope of coverage of the Civil War. Probably nothing overly interesting for intense Civil War buffs, but the manner and approach Ayers took in collecting and presenting the works will make the subject more interested to general history interested people, and possibly even those who have little interest in history, but are just curious about the American Civil War.

  • Catherine Hurst
    2018-12-26 19:29

    This is a very good collection of materials on the Civil War, including many accounts written at the time and shortly after the war. It includes famous speeches such as Lincoln's Gettysburg address, and less famous pieces such as "Men of Color, To Arms" by Frederick Douglass. It also includes excerpts from more contemporary novels such as Shelby Foote's Shiloh and Margaret Walker's Jubilee. Because the reading were selected to accompany the five-session course design, they are by nature incomplete, but reading diaries, memoirs, letters, and speeches by Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, Ambrose Bierce, Ulysses Grant, and Braxton Bragg help to create a first-hand view of the issues, with an emphasis on why the war started, the Battle of Shiloh, the business of death, and the freeing of the slaves.

  • Colin
    2018-12-19 23:39

    I'm not sure how well it would go along if you weren't part of the book clubs sponsored by the ALA, but this is a pretty solid anthology of primary texts related to the Civil War as well as a few academic articles and (most surprisingly) a pair of short stories, including Bobbie Ann Mason's "Shiloh." I'm not sure how you'd track down a copy--was it even available in stores?--but it's not bad at all.

  • Phyllis
    2019-01-01 18:32

    I read this as part of our libraries' Let's Talk About It(the Civil War) series sponsored by ALA and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Ayers, President of the University of Richmond, has put together a fantastic anthology of materials for this period. Here are readings that every American should read during their lifetime, e.g. Frederick Douglas' "men of color, to Arms" and Lincoln's Address on Colonozation to a Deputation of Negroes.

  • Carolyn
    2019-01-04 17:21

    Excellent anthology of civil war selections including speeches, journals, and memoirs. I read this in conjunction with a series of civil war discussions sponsored by libraries around the country. The most riveting selection for me was an account of the Battle of Shiloh, written by Ambrose Bierce who commanded a unit there.

  • Anna
    2018-12-30 20:21

    This was a pile of historical documents and excerpts from novels/short stories relating to the Civil War. This was the foundation for our Civil War Book club and I've thoroughly enjoyed the discussions on this subject over the past two months. I never would have read this book on my own--but I'm glad I did for this club!

  • ColetteDrouillard, PhD
    2018-12-23 20:37

    Reading for "Making Sense of the American Civil War Book Discussion Series". Sponsored by Georgia Humanities Council, developed by the National Endowment for the Humanities & the American Library Association to mark the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War. Valdosta State University - Fall 2012

  • Carolyn Fagan
    2019-01-11 19:27

    Read this for a book discussion group supported by the NY Council for the Humanities called Making Sense of the Civil War. It was the perfect compilation of speeches, diary entries and stories to provoke an excellent discussion.

  • Kimberly Ann
    2019-01-15 18:25

    I learned so very much from this book. Really great readings.

  • Ron Nurmi
    2019-01-07 20:40

    a set of readings about the Civil War & Emancipation and how we can make sense of the war

  • Peter Galamaga
    2018-12-22 21:13

    Companion to the Making Sense of the Civil War Reading and Discussion Program for Libraries. A worthwhile experience.