Read The Good Black: A True Story of Race in America by Paul M. Barrett Online

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Larry Mungin spent his life preparing to succeed in the white world. He looked away from racial inequality and hostility, believing he'd make it if he worked hard and played by the rules. He rose from a Queens housing project to Harvard Law School, and went on to practice law at major corporate firms. But just at the point when he thought he'd make it, when he should haveLarry Mungin spent his life preparing to succeed in the white world. He looked away from racial inequality and hostility, believing he'd make it if he worked hard and played by the rules. He rose from a Queens housing project to Harvard Law School, and went on to practice law at major corporate firms. But just at the point when he thought he'd make it, when he should have been considered for partnership, he sued his employer for racial discrimination. The firm claimed it went out of its way to help Larry because of his race, while Larry thought he'd been treated unfairly. Was Larry a victim of racial discrimination, or just another victim of the typical dog-eat-dog corporate law culture? A thought-provoking courtroom drama with the fast pace of a commercial novel, The Good Black asks readers to rethink their ideas about race and is a fascinating look at the inner workings of the legal profession....

Title : The Good Black: A True Story of Race in America
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780452278592
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Good Black: A True Story of Race in America Reviews

  • VMC
    2019-01-12 12:11

    Very very good book. It's a biography of a man who played by the rules but still felt he was cheated in the game. The book dissects the life, career and making of Lawrence Mungin, a Harvard-Harvard educated lawyer from Queens, New York. He lived a color blind existence, got out of the ghetto and got an ivy league education yet still faced racial discrimination at his law firm in terms of pay, equal assignments and advancement opportunities. A definite read for anyone interested in working in the corporate field or anyone else.

  • Kooheli
    2019-01-05 17:13

    An apt title for an intensely thoughtful book. I picked this up from the library because the story caught my eye, and I think I was the right reader for it: someone who didn't know the final verdict and who didn't have a preconceived notion of what did or didn't happen. I was repeatedly tempted to Google Mungin, but I'm glad I didn't. Because Barrett retains just the right amount of an objective distance from his former-roommate subject, the story unfolds with the perfect amount of narrative and speculation. I truly did not know how it would turn out, and I walked around the house for several days as I was reading the book, muttering to my husband about what I thought would happen versus what I wanted to happen. By the end, I was no longer sure of what I wanted. Yes, I believe that Mungin's stagnancy at work was fueled by racism; yes, I believe that the law firm needed to be held responsible. What Barrett does with such diplomacy, however, is to make the reader wonder just how overt racism needs to be before we can hold folks accountable for it. Institutional racism is elusive, and it takes a man of great courage and conviction to point a finger at it. Kudos to Mungin for choosing the tougher road instead of silence. The moments where Barrett addresses this myth of "the good black" and the American Dream are particularly poignant in light of all that Mungin has to sacrifice along the way. Does any one person at the firm act with overt racism? Does any one person represent an unsurmountable challenge to his professional career? Perhaps not. But racism is analogous to pornography in this sense: hard to define, but "you know it when you see it." They hired an attorney in part because he was black; they chose to keep him on board in part because he was black. It is very hard to believe that what happened in between wasn't because he was black. I was left with a restless sense of frustration when I put the book down, intensely irritated most of all by the final (and I mean final) decision but grateful that both Mungin AND Barrett took the high road. That's no easy feat.

  • Emily
    2019-01-03 15:39

    Interesting read. I'm not sure he was a victim of racism himself, but his points are well taken and I don't think enough *white* Americans are familiar with his point of view. Patrick would also add that it's a good commentary on law careers as the system is currently evolving.

  • Beverly
    2019-01-09 14:21

    this was a 3.5 read

  • Nicole
    2019-01-17 12:12

    This book is EXCELLENT! A MUST READ for any minority attorney or law school student!!!!