Read Blue-Eyed Son: The Story of an Adoption by Nicky Campbell Online

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Nicky Campbell, the Radio 5 Live and BBC1 Watchdog presenter, was adopted as a baby into a comfortable Protestant Scottish family. He always knew he was adopted, but didn't begin searching for his birth mother until he was in his thirties. When he found her, what she told him came as a shock. The clash of cultures, creed, and ideology between his parent's world and the worNicky Campbell, the Radio 5 Live and BBC1 Watchdog presenter, was adopted as a baby into a comfortable Protestant Scottish family. He always knew he was adopted, but didn't begin searching for his birth mother until he was in his thirties. When he found her, what she told him came as a shock. The clash of cultures, creed, and ideology between his parent's world and the world he grew up in couldn't be more striking. In this refreshingly candid book, he tells the story of his journey to find his parents, the dark secrets that have been revealed, and the journey he had to make after finding them....

Title : Blue-Eyed Son: The Story of an Adoption
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780330433068
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 356 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Blue-Eyed Son: The Story of an Adoption Reviews

  • Richard
    2019-03-16 06:42

    I guess only folk from the UK and Ireland will be familiar with Nicky Campbell. He is a well known TV presenter (one of his shows reunites long separated families) and radio host. I was an avid listener of his morning radio shows when in England.This is an autobiography and it is a hell of a 'story.' Not just of the adoption but it tells of Nicky Campbell 'finding' himself and maturing. The book starts somewhat memorably....'I was committing adultery in room 634 of The Holiday Inn in Birmingham...' is quite the start!He tells of his life growing up in Edinburgh with his lovely parents and how he discovered his birth mother who had come/been sent from Ireland to give birth and then give up her boy for adoption. He discovers his roots in Ireland and reflects on life in Scotland, Ireland and England.It's a very moving book and will make people like Nicky Campbell a lot more.

  • Sandra Danby
    2019-03-20 10:40

    The story of Nicky Campbell’s search for his birth parents had me hooked from the beginning. It is a personal story but everyone will be able to identify with his themes of family love, the need for belonging and a clear sense of identity.Campbell is a broadcaster and knows how to tell a story well. He charts the ups and downs of his search for his birth mother and father, the agonies of deciding to search, the worries about whether he was betraying his adoptive family.He shares the pain, the anticipation of making that first contact: “She [his wife Linda]stood in the hall and dialled the number. I was sitting on the stairs, rigid with fear, my head buried in my hands, my body folding into a foetal position. I really didn’t think I could go through with it. I was petrified and exhausted. What the hell would I say? What the hell do you say? This woman gave birth to me. I needed an epidural.“I had held this fantasy in my head for years. I had a mental picture of a beautiful but driven career woman – a free spirit who found herself in this impossible situation and made an extraordinary sacrifice. She gave her baby away. Her baby was about to catch up with her. we were about to speak to her. I was about to clothe this idealised wraith in humanity. At 29 I was about to make the first connection with my own flesh and blood, someone to whom I was genetically connected. That word – genetic – it had an almost sacred meaning for me. [It still does.] A genetic link; a magical bond. An inexpressible essence of belonging and being.“From my seat on the stairs I could hear the ring at the other end. It stopped. A woman’s voice. Soft, Irish, hesitant and wary. ‘Hello.’Campbell finds so much more than his birth mother and father, he finds his family. It doesn’t matter that he is a face familiar on the television, his story will affect everyone.I read this book as research for my novel ‘Ignoring Gravity’, the story of journalist Rose Haldane who finds out at the age of 40 that she was adopted as a baby. How must it feel, at 40, to discover you are not who you thought you were? That your family lied? That every single ‘family medical history’ form you have filled in was invalid?

  • Sull
    2019-03-11 07:30

    This was a fascinating read! Nicky Campbell is an open & engaging character, & isn't afraid to lay himself emotionally bare as he follows the various clues that led him down the rabbit-hole of his search for his birth mother & father. First he found his mother (a mighty peculiar character in her own right) & his half-sister, a real soul-mate. Then years later he took up the search again and was able to find his father and--completely unexpectedly--subsequent myriad cousins, aunts, uncles, etc. Finally, to top it all off, he helped his new half-sister track down the living remnants of HER father.This book makes it clear why adoptees become so completely obsessed with finding their biological families that they'll endanger all other relationships. It's a basic human need, to know one's roots, & should be a human right. NC conveys very well the terror and glory of it all, and the mistakes that can be made along the way, the idiocies on all three sides--the adoptees themselves, their adoptive families and their all-important & mysterious biological families. It's so easy for any of these folks to get it wrong, stumble, close the door when one should be opening it, turn away when one should be looking long & hard.... Not a perfect book by any means, as it shifts uneasily between investigative journalism & personal memoir, but amazingly moving.

  • Sandra
    2019-02-24 12:52

    I surprised myself by really enjoying this book which a friend loaned me. I found it to be a really interesting read and gave amazing insight into how adopted people feel when they are searching for their birth parents. It explores the differences between men and women and family loyalties. It made me think a lot more about the nature/nurture balance.

  • Alys Scarlet
    2019-03-19 11:39

    I enjoyed this, although it is not terribly well written, and Campbell struggles to articulate the intensity of the emotions he felt on his journey, without repetition. But as a personal story, it is interesting, especially if any of the issues affect the reader.

  • Sarah
    2019-03-16 08:49

    I have always like Nicky Campbell and it was really interesting to read about the story of his adoption and his journey to find his biological family. His book is engaging and honest and a worthwhile read.

  • Bev Mattocks
    2019-02-28 12:36

    Great book but a bit drawn out towards the end.