Read Frank Merriwell Down South (1903) by Burt L. Standish Online

frank-merriwell-down-south-1903

Burt L. Standish was one of the pseudonyms of Gilbert Patten (1866-1945). He was the author of the Frank Merriwell stories. The model for all later American juvenile sports fiction, Merriwell excelled at football, baseball, crew and track at Yale while solving mysteries and righting wrongs. He played with great strength and received traumatic blows without injury. MerriwelBurt L. Standish was one of the pseudonyms of Gilbert Patten (1866-1945). He was the author of the Frank Merriwell stories. The model for all later American juvenile sports fiction, Merriwell excelled at football, baseball, crew and track at Yale while solving mysteries and righting wrongs. He played with great strength and received traumatic blows without injury. Merriwell originally appeared in a series of magazine stories starting April 18, 1896 (Frank Merriwell: or, First Days at Fardale) in Tip Top Weekly, continuing through 1912, and later in dime novels and comic books. Patten would confine himself to a hotel room for a week to write an entire story....

Title : Frank Merriwell Down South (1903)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780548666555
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 272 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Frank Merriwell Down South (1903) Reviews

  • Skjam!
    2019-04-01 13:29

    This is the fifth of the long-running Frank Merriwell series of exciting books for boys. (See my review for "Frank Merriwell's School Days", the first of the series.) In this volume, following on directly from the cliffhanger in "Frank Merriwell's Trip West," our hero first searches for a lost Silver Palace in Mexico. After that, he travels to New Orleans for Mardi Gras, and must solve the mystery of the Queen of Flowers. This is followed by a sojourn in the Florida Everglades and a white canoe that paddles itself, and finally an encounter with moonshiners in the mountains of Tennessee.To be honest, this book feels like four short stories loosely stitched together more than a proper novel. And I am given to wonder if they weren't first serialized in a magazine first--at least one of the chapters ends in a cliffhanger that would work better if one had to wait an entire week for the outcome, not a mere quarter of the way into a bound volume.The first story was my least favorite and brought my rating down by a full star. The antiquated ethnic stereotypes shift from "19th Century, you so crazy" to the stench of racism with the depiction of Mexicans. Even the compulsively decent Frank is seen to say "One Yankee is good for six greasers." That aside, the ending was very weak, with the climax taking place off-screen and one of Frank's archenemies killed off in a couple of lines.The second story likewise ends weakly, with the antagonist killed off before his plotline can be resolved, and another character's motivation explained with "Frank later learned that...."The third story is much stronger, with a weird feel to the mysterious goings-on, but does suffer from one too many amazing coincidences. There's an unknown species of maneating plant at one point, for those who like a bit of fantasy in their stories.The fourth story is much enlivened by one of the better female characters in the series, Kate Kenyon, and manages the coincidences much better.Not particularly recommended due to the first story, if you are sharing this with a younger reader it's best to discuss why that sort of cheap ethnic stereotyping isn't acceptable anymore.For more reviews of boys' literature, see http://www.skjam.com/tag/boys/