Read Tweet by Ritch Gaiti Online

tweet

Glebe just wanted to make a difference - and he wound up changing the worldGlebe, an unlikely hero, fights for the little guy as he tweets his way to becoming the voice of the people in a witty tale so unlikely, that it is totally plausible, definitely relevant, and very funny. A quirky, ex-adman, Glebe teams up with Hartwick, a black homeless gent, to create the consumerGlebe just wanted to make a difference - and he wound up changing the worldGlebe, an unlikely hero, fights for the little guy as he tweets his way to becoming the voice of the people in a witty tale so unlikely, that it is totally plausible, definitely relevant, and very funny. A quirky, ex-adman, Glebe teams up with Hartwick, a black homeless gent, to create the consumer revolution that topples once powerful businesses. He just asked people ‘if you could change one thing, what would that be?’ He started recording their answers on napkins procured from the local diner and wound up and tweeted his way to changing the world. And his target included everything from dumb advertising, to incessant telephone calls, the economy, the government and everything else that people were once powerless to impact. That worldwide boycott, yep, that was Glebe.Tweet is a funny romp through the world we live in: the powerless consumer, over-saturated advertising, incessant marketing and big business that has suddenly become hard of hearing even though your call is very important to them. Glebe did what you would have done if you had thought of it and were quirky and passionate and wanted to just make a diff....

Title : Tweet
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780983383703
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 322 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Tweet Reviews

  • Benhamish Allen
    2019-02-04 02:31

    Tweet is very fast paced and I laughed a few times. A single laugh is priceless, and Tweet is only 3.99 at the time of this writing. (138)In the age of instantaneous global communication, who doesn't wonder at the implications of a single message having the power to change the world? But what exactly should be changed? Change itself? According to Gaiti, Tweet,"...is about change--and the individual's (in)ability to fight back against the large companies and government. It's also about excessive consumerism and how the advertising and marketing companies are infiltrating every part of our lives."Tweet seeks to answer our questions about change and does so on the border of being fantastically absurd while also humorous, one of my favorite combinations.Although the books description does mention the use of multiple Tweets, Glebe the protoganist only Tweets a handful of times in the story. According to Gaiti,"Tweeting (website, napkins) are only the vehicles Glebe uses to make change-it is not the subject of the story (regardless of the title). Glebe's understanding and very basic views of Twitter et al are within the nature of the character. He is not totally adept at these tools--in fact, he is a neophyte-and his actions and reactions support this. Glebe is entering a world which he has not really played in before."Glebe is the only fully developed character in Tweet, his friends and acquaintances seem to be props, there to help Glebe realize his goals. The stereotypical office manager for instance who cannot hear anything that Glebe says and is only concerned with himself. The supporting characters exaggerated actions were frequently funny though and occasionally quite plausible.Hartwick, Glebe's friend that he meets on the street is the most interesting character in the story, and Glebe knows this, often wondering what exactly is it that motivates Hartwick. But that is about as far as Glebe goes in understanding the motivations behind Hartwick. Glebe is oftentimes more concerned with his own romantic life or lack thereof, an interesting subplot but one that seemed to distract Glebe from the main thrust of his quest.Gaiti experiments with product placement in Tweet, naming a few brands in the beginning of the book. Done so in jest to be sure, but Glebe does work in the advertising business and placing advertisements in ebooks is an idea under consideration in some circles, so at least in this realm Gaiti has some prescience.Tweet is at it's best on the street, with Glebe spreading his message through the use of cocktail napkins and hand painted signs. The thinness of the description behind the messages made me wonder if Tweet was actually a sarcastic look at the importance that many people place on their social internet experiences. But perhaps I am just reading too much into Tweet.

  • T.J.
    2019-01-30 03:26

    I liked this book very much. It took about 3 chapters until I actually warmed to Glebe, but once I did I was rooting for him the whole way through.This was a talented and thorough combination of current technology, modern (and possibly timeless) discontent, and Everyman's longing to make a difference... though almost no one ever does, till Glebe...

  • Ritch Gaiti
    2019-01-29 08:33

    I laughed the entire time I was writing it.

  • Ritch Gaiti
    2019-02-07 00:24