Read The Rhythm Boys of Omaha Central: High School Basketball at the '68 Racial Divide by Steve Marantz Susie Buffett Online

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In the spring of 1968, the Omaha Central High School basketball team made history with its first all-black starting lineup. Their nickname, the Rhythm Boys, captured who they were and what they did on the court. Led by star center Dwaine Dillard, the Rhythm Boys were a shoo-in to win the state championship. But something happened on their way to glory.   In early March, seIn the spring of 1968, the Omaha Central High School basketball team made history with its first all-black starting lineup. Their nickname, the Rhythm Boys, captured who they were and what they did on the court. Led by star center Dwaine Dillard, the Rhythm Boys were a shoo-in to win the state championship. But something happened on their way to glory.   In early March, segregationist George Wallace, in a third-party presidential bid, made a campaign stop in Omaha. By the time he left town, Dillard was in jail, his coach was caught between angry political factions, and the city teetered on the edge of racial violence. So began the Nebraska state high school basketball tournament the next day, caught in the vise of history. The Rhythm Boys of Omaha Central tells a true story about high school basketball, black awakening and rebellion, and innocence lost in a watershed year. The drama of civil rights in 1968 plays out in this riveting social history of sports, politics, race, and popular culture in the American heartland....

Title : The Rhythm Boys of Omaha Central: High School Basketball at the '68 Racial Divide
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780803234345
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 264 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Rhythm Boys of Omaha Central: High School Basketball at the '68 Racial Divide Reviews

  • MJ
    2019-03-30 03:16

    While the topic was interesting, the story itself was too disjointed and jumped from third person to first person. The basketball portions of the book were small in comparison to the narrative commentary on race relations not only in Omaha, but throughout the country.

  • Kayley
    2019-03-26 06:26

    Reading this book was really cool because I could identify the places they were talking about and got to understand history I never knew existed in my own city.

  • Blexicana2
    2019-04-19 02:23

    Very interesting read. Paints a picture that many younger people in Omaha are unaware of. Definitely recommend this book as well as the documentary A Time for The Burning. Although not the main focus, really found the parts about Gayle Sayers compelling. As many are familiar with his story in relation to the NFL and Brian's Song, this book adds new perspective and background on the atmosphere he came from. Again, recommend this book for all 30 For 30 fans.

  • Sarah
    2019-04-10 02:15

    I was drawn to this book more by the Nebraska history than the basketball, and I wasn't disappointed. Steve Marantz – himself an Omaha Central student in the late '60s and an eyewitness to the accounts he describes – does a great job weaving the events in Omaha into a national historical context. It's a very readable, very interesting story.

  • Lucy
    2019-04-23 05:28

    A very well researched account of the race riot that occurred in 1967/68 following the appearance of George Wallace in Omaha, Nebraska. The author has used the remarkable basketball team of Central High School as the focus of his story. Diaries, interviews, newspaper accounts are utilized by the author to verify a tale between two cultures of bigotry, politics, and sports.

  • Sally
    2019-04-25 02:22

    This was not the most literary book every written. I was not perhaps the intended audience. It *does* however, give a good snapshot of Omaha in a very tumultuous time. So, if you enjoy stories about Basketball, or are from Omaha, I would recommend this book.

  • Jenni
    2019-04-17 05:15

    Wow, this exposes little known historical facts about Omaha that put current views and sterotypes into perspective. A must read for Omahans!