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Professor Brian Cox is back with another insightful and mind-blowing exploration of space. This time he shows us our universe as we've never seen it before....

Title : Wonders of the Universe
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780007395828
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Wonders of the Universe Reviews

  • Rachel
    2018-09-13 12:25

    Absolutely amazing. I Kinda want to marry him...

  • Jim Whitefield
    2018-09-23 10:36

    Having watched the four part TV series, I was delighted to acquire the accompanying book which is in four parts, matching the TV series. Professor Cox has a way of explaining the complex in the most simple of terms and I loved every moment of my read. I learned more from this one book regarding the universe than from anything else I have read. I began to understand entropy which I never thought I would. And the photos are stunning. Not only does it cover the beginning, progression and the current development of everything in the known universe, it also predicts the future. "...our understanding of fundamental physics allows us to make concrete predictions about how they will end their days." And he is talking of the ultimate destiny of the universe in about '10 to the power of 100' years - and as he says, that is a big number. To me, that is the biblical equivalent of sound prophecy - based on science. Thus, although believers in gods may not like it, as this accurately covers all known space/time, past, present and future, to me it is the ultimate Bible - and science is God and people like Cox are his prophets. My all time favourite learning experience, coupled with Dawkins' 'Greatest Show on Earth' through which I gained a similarly satisfying understanding of evolution.

  • Alazzar
    2018-09-08 09:39

    The layout of this book is perfect for the individual with a fleeting attention span (e.g., me): there are lots of pictures, not to mention the occasional page that contains no more text than a single, giant-font sentence. These little "coffee breaks" are properly spaced to ensure that, any time my mind is about to start wandering, I get to flip a few pages in rapid succession and feel like I'm still making good progress.That being said, the information provided here is excellent. (And the pictures sure are purdy, too!) My favorite sections were "Stardust" and "Falling," because they deal with things like the nuts-and-bolts workings of stars and the effects of gravity in (literally) shaping our universe.I was less pleased with the final chapter ("Destiny"), either because I'd reached my threshold for being able to pay attention to non-fiction writing at that point or because I just couldn't stop thinking about the comic books I knew I'd be reading as soon as I was done.In any case, this is a great book for anyone with even the slightest interest in how our universe works--Brian Cox does a great job (as he did with the more advanced Why Does E=mc²?) of dumbing things down for the casual reader without treating us like outright idiots.Oh, and if you're into this sorta thing, I'd also recommend checking out the TV series How the Universe Works, with Mike Rowe. You can find it on Netflix streaming (or, at least, you could at one time), and it's positively excellent.

  • Gary
    2018-09-19 15:30

    If you enjoyed the show, you will enjoy the book. If you haven't seen the show, you might still enjoy the book, but you might also wonder why there are so many darkly vignetted photos of the sillouete of the author standing with his back turned to the camera, looking at stuff. It is a little cheesy, I admit, but I didn't mind it because Cox really does seem almost giddy about the universe. To him, everything is Awesome, Incredible, Inspiring, Beautiful, etc. At times his giddy enthusiam almost made me chuckle, and I'm almost positive that the "pale blue dot" photo and the Hubble deep field photo were "The most important photo mankind has ever witnessed. Ever." That he seems to go overboard from time to time doesn't distract from the overall quality of the book, which is fantastic. It really is well written, the photographs are beautiful, and the drawings and diagrams are so cool they would look good hanging on the wall. Somebody with a real sense of design put them together with a simplistic, alsmot retro pop feel to them.The book was a fun read. Now that I'm finished I will probably go back and read it again sometime, and I can definitely wholeheartedly recommend it to anybody who has even a passing interest in the universe.

  • Katya
    2018-09-20 11:39

    one of the best book on cosmology I have ever read. Young British professor Brian Cox explaines the most complex and mysterious things such as the Big Bang Itself in a very simple language, sometimes even using highscool physics course experiments as an illustration. The book is beautifully illustrated.

  • Vlad
    2018-09-22 10:21

    Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 103-4 | Added on Monday, December 02, 2013, 02:21 PMOn Christmas Eve 1968, Apollo 8 passed into the darkness behind the Moon, and Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and William Anders became the first humans in history to lose sight of Earth.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 126-27 | Added on Monday, December 02, 2013, 02:25 PMThe cosmos is about the smallest hole that a man can hide his head in. —G.K. Chesterton==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 201-2 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:40 PMGalaxies such as the spiral-shaped Dwingeloo 1 have recently been found hidden behind the Milky Way. This discovery supports what we already know: that there are many more wonders out there in the Universe that we have yet to discover.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 213-16 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:43 PMThe spectacular remains and towering pillars of Karnak Temple are a testament to the Egyptian belief in the power and importance of the Amun-Re, the Sun God, in their daily life, and of the Sun itself. Karnak Temple, home of Amun-Re, universal god, stands facing the Valley of the Kings across the Nile in the city of Luxor.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 225-27 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:44 PMEgyptian religious mythology is rich and complex. With almost 1,500 known deities, countless temples and tombs and a detailed surviving literature, the mythology of the great civilisation of the Nile is considered the most sophisticated religious system ever devised.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 236-39 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:45 PMThe original mound of earth is the god Tatenen, meaning ‘risen land’ (he also represented the fertile land that emerged from the Nile floods), while the lotus flower is the god Nefertem, the god of perfumes. Most important is the Sun God, born of the lotus blossom, who took on many forms but remained central to Egyptian religious thought for over 3,000 years. It was the Sun God who brought light to the cosmos, and with light came all of creation.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 249-50 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:45 PMIn the Egyptian Book of the Dead, Amun is referred to as the ‘eldest of the gods of the eastern sky’, symbolising his emergence as the solar deity at sunrise.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 256-59 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:46 PMThe Great Hypostyle Hall, the dominant feature of the temple, is aligned such that on 21 December, the winter solstice and shortest day in the Northern Hemisphere, the disc of the Sun rises between the great pillars and floods the space with light, which comes from a position directly over a small building inside which Amun-Re himself was thought to reside.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 271-72 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:46 PMa temple the size of Karnak will always be aligned with something in the sky, simply because it has buildings that point in all directions!==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 277-79 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:47 PMIt seems clear therefore that the columns are positioned and decorated to mark the compass directions around the temple, which is persuasive evidence that the heart of this building is aligned to capture the light from an important celestial event – the rising of the Sun in midwinter.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 312-13 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:51 PMThis is because we now think that around 95 per cent of the mass of galaxies such as our own Milky Way is made up of dark matter.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 323 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:51 PMGeoffrey Chaucer: ‘See yonder, lo, the Galaxyë, Which men clepeth the Milky Wey, For hit is whyt.’==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 325-27 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:52 PMM87, also known as Virgo A and Messier 87, is a giant elliptical galaxy located 54 million light years away from Earth in the Virgo Cluster. In this image the central jet is visible, which is a powerful beam of hot gas produced by a massive black hole in the core of the galaxy.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 331-33 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:52 PMTaken in December 2010, this is the most detailed picture of the Andromeda Galaxy, or M31, taken so far. It is our largest and closest spiral galaxy, and in this picture we can clearly see rings of new star formations developing.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 337-39 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:53 PMZwicky 18 was once thought to be the youngest galaxy, as its bright stars suggested it was only 500 million years old. However, recent Hubble Space Telescope images have identified older stars within it, making the galaxy as old as others but with new star formations.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 340-42 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:55 PMOur galaxy, the Milky Way, contains somewhere between 200 and 400 billion stars, depending on the number of faint dwarf stars that are difficult for us to detect. The majority of stars lie in a disc around 100,000 light years in diameter and, on average, around 1,000 light years thick.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 346-49 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:56 PMAt the centre of our galaxy, and possibly every galaxy in the Universe, there is believed to be a super-massive black hole. Astronomers believe this because of precise measurements of the orbit of a star known as S2. This star orbits around the intense source of radio waves known as Sagittarius A* (pronounced ‘Sagittarius A-star’) that sits at the galactic centre. S2’s orbital period is just over fifteen years, which makes it the fastest-known orbiting object, reaching speeds of up to 2 per cent of the speed of light.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 353-54 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:57 PMThe only known way of cramming 4.1 million times the mass of the Sun into a space less than 17 light hours across is as a black hole, which is why astronomers are so confident that a giant black hole sits at the centre of the Milky Way.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 359-60 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:57 PMThe Quintuplet Cluster contains one of the most luminous stars in our galaxy, the Pistol Star, which is thought to be near the end of its life and on the verge of becoming a supernova==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 372-74 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:58 PMIn 2007, scientists using the Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory in Chile were able to observe a star in the Galactic Halo that is thought to be the oldest object in the Milky Way. HE 1523-0901 is a star in the last stages of its life; known as a red giant, it is a vast structure far bigger than our sun, but much cooler at its surface. HE 1523-0901 is==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 377-79 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 12:59 PMThis is why the detection of five radioactive elements in the light from HE 1523-0901 was so important. This dying star turns out to be 13.2 billion years old – that’s almost as old==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 384-86 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:02 PMUntil very recently, it was thought that our galaxy contained only four spiral arms – Perseus, Norma, Scutum–Centaurus and Carina–Sagittarius, with our sun in an off shoot of the latter called the Orion spur – but there is now thought to be an additional arm, called the Outer arm, an extension to the Norma arm.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 387-88 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:06 PMThe Sun was once thought to be an average star, but we now know that it shines brighter than 95 per cent of all other stars in the Milky Way.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 389-90 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:06 PMEvery second, the Sun burns 600 million tonnes of hydrogen in its core, producing 596 million tonnes of helium in the fusion reaction.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 390 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:06 PMThe missing four million tonnes of mass emerges as energy, which slowly travels to the Sun’s photosphere,==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 389-91 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:07 PMEvery second, the Sun burns 600 million tonnes of hydrogen in its core, producing 596 million tonnes of helium in the fusion reaction. The missing four million tonnes of mass emerges as energy, which slowly travels to the Sun’s photosphere, where it is released into the galaxy and across the Universe as light.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 400-401 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:07 PMThe Lagoon Nebula is one such star nursery; within this giant interstellar cloud of gas and dust, new stars are created.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 405-6 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:08 PMHerschel 36. This star is thought to be a ‘ZAMS’ star (zero ago main sequence) because it has just begun to produce the dominant part of its energy from hydrogen fusion in its core.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 408-10 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:08 PMEta Carinae is a pair of billowing gas and dust clouds that are the remnants of a stellar explosion from an unstable star system. The system consists of at least two giant stars, and shines with a brightness four million times that of our sun. One of these stars is thought to be a Wolf-Rayet star.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 412 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:08 PMIn 1843, Eta Carinae became one of the brightest stars in the Universe when it exploded.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 441-42 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:13 PMor ‘corpuscles’, as he called them in his Hypothesis of Light, published in 1675.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 444-45 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:13 PMLeonhard Euler, who felt that the phenomena of diffraction could only be explained by a wave theory.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 445-46 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:13 PMIn 1801, the English doctor Thomas Young appeared to settle the matter once and for all when he reported the results from his famous double-slit experiment, which clearly showed that light diffracted, and therefore must travel in the form of a wave.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 465-67 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:16 PMMichael Faraday was busy doing what scientists do best – playing around with wire and magnets. He discovered that if you push a magnet through a coil of wire, an electric current flows through the wire while the magnet is moving.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 470-72 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:17 PMAmpère discovered that two parallel wires carrying electric currents experience a force between them; this force is still used today to define the ampere, or amp – the unit of electric current. A single amp is defined as the current that must flow along two parallel wires of infinite length and negligible diameter to produce an attractive force of 0.0000007 Newtons between them.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 476-78 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:17 PMMaxwell, who, in a series of papers in 1861 and 1862, developed a single theory of electricity and magnetism that was able to explain all of the experimental work of Faraday, Ampère and others. But Maxwell’s crowning glory came in 1864, when he published a paper that is undoubtedly one of the greatest achievements in the history of science.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 481-82 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:18 PMElectricity and magnetism can be unified by introducing two new concepts: electric and magnetic fields. The idea of a field is central to modern physics;==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 494-97 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:19 PMWhere c is the speed of light and the quantities μ0 and ε0 are related to the strengths of electric and magnetic fields. The fact that the velocity of light can be measured experimentally on a bench top with wires and magnets was the key piece of evidence that light is an electromagnetic wave. ==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 507-10 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:26 PMMaxwell’s equations also predict exactly how fast these waves must fly away from the electric charges that create them. The speed of the waves is the ratio of the strengths of the electric and magnetic fields – quantities that had been measured by Faraday, Ampère and others and were well known to Maxwell. When Maxwell did the sums, he must have fallen off his chair. He found that his equations predicted that the waves in the electric and magnetic fields travelled at the speed of light!==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 513 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:26 PMIn modern language, we would say that light is an electromagnetic wave.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 515 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:26 PMit had first been measured by Ole Romer in 1676.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 521-24 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:29 PMEmpedocles and Galileo, separated by almost two millennia, felt that light must travel at a finite, if extremely high, velocity. Empedocles’s reasoning was elegant, pre-dating Aristotle by a century. He considered light travelling across the vast distance from the Sun to Earth, and noted that everything that travels must move from one point to another.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 527-30 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:29 PMGalileo set out to measure the speed of light using two lamps. He held one and sent an assistant a large distance away with another. When they were in position, Galileo opened a shutter on his lamp, letting the light out. When his assistant saw the flash, he opened his shutter, and Galileo attempted to note down the time delay between the opening of his shutter and his observation of the flash from his assistant’s lamp. His conclusion was that light must travel extremely rapidly, because he was unable to determine its speed.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 548-50 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:31 PMThe point at which the Sun crosses the Meridian is also the point at which it reaches its highest position in the sky on any given day as it journeys from sunrise in the east to sunset in the west. We call this time noon, or midday.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 551-53 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:31 PMto determine your longitude, set a clock to read 12 o’clock when the Sun reaches the highest point in the sky at Greenwich. If it reads 2pm when the Sun reaches its highest point in the sky where you are, you are thirty degrees to the west of Greenwich.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 560-61 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:36 PMGalileo, having discovered the moons of Jupiter, was convinced he could use the orbits of these moons as a clock,==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 573-74 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:37 PM1671, Romer and Picard observed over one hundred of Io’s eclipses, noting the times and intervals between each.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 579-81 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:38 PMThese sketches (published in Istoria e Dimonstrazione in 1613) show the changing position of the moons of Jupiter over 12 days. Jupiter is represented by the large circle, with the four moons as dots on either side.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 589-91 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:38 PMRomer’s genius was to realise that this pattern implied there was nothing wrong with the clockwork of Jupiter and Io, because the error depended on the distance between Earth and Jupiter and had nothing to do with Io itself.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 594-95 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:40 PMFactor in the time it takes light to travel between Jupiter and Earth and the theory works. Romer did this by trial and error, and was able to correctly account for the shifting times of the observed eclipses.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 598-99 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:41 PMHe simply stated that it takes light twenty-two minutes to cross the diameter of Earth’s orbit.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 600-601 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:41 PMIn his ‘Treatise sur la lumière’ (1678), Huygens quotes a speed in strange units as 110 million toises per second. Since a toise is two metres (seven feet), this gives a speed of 220,000,000 metres per second, which is not far off the modern value of 299,792,458==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 631-32 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:43 PMthe sound barrier was not breached until 14 October 1947, when Chuck Yeager became the first human to pilot a supersonic flight. Flying in the Bell–XS1,==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 663-64 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 01:59 PMIn Einstein’s theory, anything that has no mass is compelled to travel at the special speed through space. Conversely, anything that has mass is compelled to travel slower than this speed.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 694-96 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 02:02 PMAt the very edge of the Solar System, the round-trip travel time for radio signals sent and received by Voyager 1 on its journey into interstellar space is currently thirty-one hours, fifty-two minutes and twenty-two seconds, as of September 2010.==========Wonders of the Universe (Brian Cox)- Highlight Loc. 702-4 | Added on Wednesday, December 04, 2013, 02:05 PMGreat Rift Valley was such a place. We arrived in Tanzania on 10 May 2010 for the first day of filming. After a brief overnight stay close to the airport at Kilimanjaro, we were driven out into the Serengeti

  • Noah Goats
    2018-09-19 13:20

    Engaging and accessible, this is a pretty good introduction to the past present and future of our universe. It’s a tie in with a BBC tv show (which I have not seen) and this fact distorts the book in odd ways. For tv the author needed to make sure he had interesting images of places around the earth so that viewers had pretty things to look at. This may have made sense for tv, but these bits feel a little forced into the book. On the other hand, this book is packed with gorgeous pictures of space. There is a lot to see and to read and Wonders of the Universe is worth your time if the subject interest you (and how could it not interest you?)

  • Book
    2018-09-18 11:12

    Wonders of the Universe by Brian Cox and Andrew Cohen"Wonders of the Universe " is the wonderful book that enthusiastically explains the universe by examining the laws of physics here on Earth. What sets this book apart is Professor Cox's innate ability to make the wonders of the universe accessible to the masses and fun to learn. Well known physicist and science celebrity Brian Cox uses the latest in scientific understanding and creative analogies to teach us about our universe. This enlightening 245-page book is composed of the following four chapters: 1. Messengers, 2. Stardust, 3. Falling, and 4. Destiny.Positives: 1. The innate ability to make science accessible and fun for the masses.2. Fascinating and ambitious topic in the hands of a master educator.3. Great use of charts and illustrations to assist the reader. This book is full of awe-inspiring photos.4. A great explanation of the Big Bang Theory...Bazinga, I'm sorry I couldn't contain myself.5. Just a great educational tool. Professor Cox uses very creative and practical analogies top explain how the universe works. His boyish enthusiasm is also contagious.6. Full of fun factoids throughout the book. "We are seeing the sun as it was eight minutes in the past".7. Physics has never been more fun. This is the kind of book you can give to any layperson to learn about the laws of physics and how it applies: light, sound, speed, heat, etc...8. The fascinating world of astronomy. Stars, supernovae, black holes, nebulas, oh my...9. This is an ambitious book that covers so much in less than 250 pages yet does it so well.10. Great use of converging sciences to explain the universe: chemistry, biology, geology, etc...11. Many great discoveries and their applications.12. The four fundamental forces of nature.13. A great explanation of our understanding of the structure of matter.14. Fission versus fusion.15. A fantastic explanation on gravity.16. Professor Cox takes us on a journey of some of the most unique sites of our planet in order to explain interesting topics of physics. 17. Time like you've never seen before.18. Laws of thermodynamics.19. The life cycle of stars. The future of our universe.20. If you liked the series (can get on DVD) you will love the book.Negatives: 1. The kindle version suffers from some formatting issues that I understand are being corrected.2. The book tends to repeat some facts. The number of stars in our galaxy comes to mind.3. This book is intended for the masses so those in the field will find it quite basic.4. No formal bibliography or notes section.In summary, I really enjoyed this book. It's a kind of love affair that I have for science. It's accessible, covers a lot of territory, educational and it's just plain fun to read. The book is full of illustrations and clever analogies that help readers get a grasp of what otherwise are complex concepts. If you are looking for an ambitious yet introductory book on physics, this is the perfect gift. I loved the book and highly recommend it!Recommendations: "Space Chronicles" by Neil deGrasse Tyson, " About Time: Cosmology and Culture at the Twilight of the Big Bang" by Adam Frank, "Death From The Skies" by Philip Plait, "Physics of the Future" by Michio Kaku, "A Universe from Nothing" by Lawrence Krauss, "The Grand Design" by Stephen Hawking, "The Age of Everything" by Mathew Hedman, and "Cosmos" by Carl Sagan.

  • Jack Barten
    2018-09-17 09:41

    This is an excellent book that explains complex areas of science in a coherent way. One of my frustrations with Brian Cox's TV works is he speaks in a such a slow way that it doesn't cover as much ground an hour could. This could be down to the BBC assuming that people can't take in information as fast as students in a physics lecture would be expected to but at least with the book you can read as fast or slow as you mind and level of knowledge allows. After many people bought and few people read Stephen Hawking's Brief History of Time there was a danger that the broader public had been put off physics books. This book and some others in recent years has changed all that (along with Brian Cow TV shows). This is a remarkable achievement since physics has got so mind-bending now that graduate students today are having to do mental gymnastics way beyond that of their counterparts from 50 years ago. It is great that Cox can find time to do such books and TV shows and I am sure that his influence will encourage new generations of physicists to make sense of problems that are currently beyond anyone's grasp.

  • Natasha (Diarist) Holme
    2018-09-18 11:28

    "Two and a half million years ago, when our distant relative Homo habilis was foraging for food across the Tanzanian savannah, a beam of light left the Andromeda Galaxy and began its journey across the Universe. As that light beam raced across space at the speed of light, generations of pre-humans and humans lived and died; whole species evolved and became extinct, until one member of that unbroken lineage, me, happened to gaze up into the sky below the constellation we call Cassiopeia and focus that beam of light onto his retina. A two-and-a-half-billion-year journey ends by creating an electrical impulse in a nerve fibre, triggering a cascade of wonder in a complex organ called the human brain that didn’t exist anywhere in the Universe when the journey began"^ ^ ^That kind of mind-blowing observation punctuates this rather thrilling book. Good stuff.

  • itchyfeet__
    2018-08-27 12:37

    For a complete amateur like me, no-one can beat Brian Cox in terms of explaining things in an engaging and understandable way. I saw the series on TV a while back and this is well worth reading, as it covers even more material. At times it is a little repetitive but to be honest I did find this helpful as there is just SO MUCH to get your head around otherwise and he does help you connect dots where you might not. I am not naturally a scientist (I am a language graduate with an interest in the arts) so for me to be kept interested in relativity, the periodic table, and neutron stars long enough to read this book, really does say something about how engaging Brian Cox is as a writer :)

  • Bharath Ramakrishnan
    2018-09-01 16:28

    If you want to read only one book about the universe, this is the book you should read! It is written in great style pooling all science has learnt about the universe till date. There are also excellent colour pictures to go with the chapters.

  • Paul
    2018-08-26 09:11

    How many times can one person get their face in one book!?

  • Tapasya
    2018-09-16 10:38

    What a Delightful Book

  • Dahlia
    2018-09-19 16:15

    This book is interesting and informative-you can tell Brian Cox is a professor who is passionate about his subject. If only I had a teacher like him... :) Definitely worth reading.

  • Chris Waraksa
    2018-08-29 10:22

    Nice collection of interesting bits about cosmology and science. I picked it up from the library to try and catch up on what is commonly known now that wasn't known in the 1980s when I last took a physics class. The book has a nice format of bite-sized articles about scientific concepts that are really quite interesting. Text and illustrations are both very accessible. I enjoyed the bit that explains what a rainbow is and all of the discussion of the birth and death of stars. 100 billion galaxies in the universe.

  • Steven
    2018-09-11 13:30

    The book is as the title describes, about wonders of the universe. While there was interesting information, I felt the explanations could have been better. Also, some of the writing seemed muddled and could have been improved. The travelogue, while interesting, seemed out of place. The book was decent, but could have been better.

  • Sheikh JaberNurani
    2018-09-17 11:36

    Just amazing!

  • Ryan Finlayson
    2018-09-23 11:28

    Very good! Learned a lot about the universe, descriptive pictures are beautiful :)

  • Horia Calborean
    2018-09-12 16:35

    3 stars for the first part of the book. 5 stars for the last part.

  • Hitesh Bansal
    2018-09-21 10:31

    amazing ride.... explained every concept in the most easiest of ways....

  • Edwin Ekadu
    2018-09-19 13:13

    I learned agreat deal from this book about the Universe than from anything else I have read.amazing book you should read if you want to take a trip around Earth and the rest of the cosmos

  • Emma D
    2018-09-22 08:25

    Absolutely loved reading this book, fascinating & I can't wait to read Brian Cox's other books. I learnt so much but feel I know nothing compared to scientists old & new. Even if you only have a slight interest in science, Brian's narrative will get you excited about all things space & time.

  • Reija
    2018-09-15 09:21

    'Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known'Carl Sagan

  • Ashleigh
    2018-09-15 09:29

    I love science, but I've never really been much of a physics buff - even though stars and astronomy have always been something I found interesting. After watching the TV Series, I really wanted to read the book because I just find that Brian Cox explains things like this in such a way that I remember them. The book was just fantastic and married in with the series perfectly; I loved the history and the mythology and the religious insights to everything too - particularly in the first section when the history of the Sun is explored. The pictures in the book are just awe-inspiring. They're utterly beautiful and I loved reading it on the kindle because it just gave them a whole new quality (I could zoom in and such, they're really, really high quality). It's accessible, covers a lot of territory, educational and it's just really fun to read. The book is full of illustrations and clever analogies that help readers get a grasp of what otherwise are complex concepts. I also found myself reading it in Brian Cox's (somewhat annoying) voice in places - I found it quite hard to NOT do that and it amused me. I found it a really basic, but solid grounding in to a subject that I always found quite mind-boggling and I'd recommend it to anyone who wanted to read a bit of contemporary science; it's probably a little 'basic' for someone with a degree but for someone with an interest in the subject, or someone who wants to understand it it's a perfect introductory book!

  • Preludes
    2018-09-24 11:41

    Everyone needs a good tabletop book and if you’re looking for something that looks sophisticated, is a fascinating read, and had plenty of gorgeous pictures to peruse when the adverts are on telly then ‘Wonders of the Universe’ is for you. Written to tie in with his Tv series, this nevertheless stands on its own two feet as a detailed yet very approachable journey through the stars and astrophysics. Complicated theories such as entropy, quantum theory, thermodynamics and the beauties and limitations of E=MC2 are all explained in clear enthusiastic language that is never dumbed down or blurred yet anecdotally linked to what we see around us in our every day lives. This provides a thorough introduction to the often intimidating science while never losing sight of the visual beauties that inspired such wonder in the first place. Mixing detailed diagrams and equations alongside artistically wonderful glossy photographs and guided by the warm explanations of the writer that never patronise, this is a real gem that educates and delights in equal measure.

  • Sara Forsberg
    2018-09-08 10:37

    See my review of the Wonders of the Solar System - this book is just as magnificent as that one. Perhaps even more so, because this is slightly more ambitious. Its 4 chapters focus on 4 quite complex fundamentals of science (light, formation of stars, gravity and entropy) and attempts to explain them to the layperson reader. And it works - after reading this I obviously don't feel like I understand everything but it's a significant increase in knowledge from what I had before. I never thought I'd be able to come close to grasp Einstein's theories, for instance, or the Second Law of Thermodynamics and what it has to to with the end of the universe, but I can now say I feel like I have a tenuous hold on those theories. It's a rather wonderful experience to feel like you suddenly understand the world around you a little better, and that's what this book ultimately gave me. Everyone should read it.

  • David Stoney
    2018-08-27 09:23

    Although it's been an interesting read so far, unfortunately it uses the same device as the TV series to explain various concepts. Whilst this may be useful on occasion, unfortunately I found the TV version images to be more like a travelogue and the images were too distracting from the concepts being explained.It seems that Prof. Cox allowed some arty producer/director to use the images to dumb it all down - as so often happens when people who've only done media studies and social studies get involved with proper science. It's almost as if they don't trust us to be able to understand the concepts being explained (for further proof just look what they did to anything with maths, or chemistry) and poor old Prof. Jim Al-Kalili (sorry if I spelt his name wrong), but each time the programmes end up like an episode of "Wish You Were Here".Other than that the books by Prof. Cox are a fascinating read....

  • Andrew
    2018-08-27 14:31

    Ok my Brian Cox run is carrying on - moving on from the solar system to the universe. The book is as with the first sumptuously illustrated with glossy fascinating images to grab your attention and cleverly worded phrases to pull you in to the text of each section. However as you can imagine the subject matter has grown. This means that much more obscure subjects and facts can be explored - if you like it is building upon the first book (there are many references which although you do not need to have read the first book do certainly become more accessible if you have) The book is a fascinating read and if anything proves that although the internet can store and access more information quicker and more thoroughly than any book. However a book can take you on a journey through it all and give you a sense of truly leaning something rather than just collecting facts along the way.

  • Craig
    2018-09-08 10:20

    Enjoyable and informative although I found it to be a little haphazardly organised in places. In large part I think this was due to the layout of the kindle edition I read, wherein illustrations, photos, captions and quotes were seemingly scattered at random, often making reading passages with references to these images a little tough going. Topics did seem to jump around a lot, with a couple of paragraphs on one thing then onto something new, leaving me at times wishing there was more said on the previous topic. Again I get the feeling that the eBook format was not kind to this book and this topic jumping is probably less jarring in the printed form. But in general I was left with the sense of wanting more; what's in here is good, but feels often feels repetitious and not as in depth as I would have liked.