Read Day of Atonement by Faye Kellerman Online

day-of-atonement

Peter Decker of the L.A.P.D. never dreamed he'd be spending his honeymoon with his new wife, Rina Lazarus, in an Orthodox Jewish enclave in Brooklyn, New York -- or that a terrible event would end it so abruptly. But a boy has vanished from the midst of this close-knit religious community, a troubled youth fleeing the tight bonds and strictures he felt were strangling him.Peter Decker of the L.A.P.D. never dreamed he'd be spending his honeymoon with his new wife, Rina Lazarus, in an Orthodox Jewish enclave in Brooklyn, New York -- or that a terrible event would end it so abruptly. But a boy has vanished from the midst of this close-knit religious community, a troubled youth fleeing the tight bonds and strictures he felt were strangling him. The runaway, Noam, is not traveling alone. A killer has taken him under his wing to introduce Noam to a savage world of blood and terror. And now Decker must find them both somewhere in America before a psychopath ends the life of a confused and frightened youngster whose only sin was to want something more....

Title : Day of Atonement
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780060554897
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 373 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Day of Atonement Reviews

  • Brina
    2018-09-23 08:12

    In this fourth book in her mystery series, Faye Kellerman details Peter and Rina Decker's honeymoon to Brooklyn, New York for Rosh Hashanah. They are to spend the new year at the home of Rina's former in laws, Rabbi and Mrs Lazarus. Per family tradition the extended Lazarus and Levine families spend the holiday together, as though they are one large mishpacha (family). Yet something is amiss: when Peter first notices Mrs Levine, he sees her face, and realizes that she is his mother who gave him up for adoption at birth. Something else is amiss as well: Peter's actual teenage nephew, although the family doesn't know it, has gone missing. Although on a two week vacation and it is a holiday, Peter with Rina's help takes the case immediately.As the case take the newlyweds through Brooklyn, back to Los Angeles, and then back to Brooklyn, the Deckers grapple with married life and how to trust each other. Rina actually is much closer with the teen's family than Peter is, yet it is his blood relative. She wants nothing more than to help solve the case, but he would like to separate work and home life. All the while, thoughts keep going through his mind as to how to confront his mother and half siblings when finally given the opportunity to do so. I enjoyed this mystery more than books two or three, although not at the level of book one, because it runs the gamut of human emotions. Yes, it is a page turning detective story, but it also delves more into Peter's back story and introduces us to more characters. Although it doesn't explicitly say it, I feel Kellerman leaves the door open for the two boys to split time between Los Angeles and New York. How will they respond to their new family? That is a story for another time and place, as I look forward to book five and reading through this series to the end.

  • Mike (the Paladin)
    2018-09-17 15:01

    Ahh, the honeymoon, a time for joy, celebration, bonding, love, excitement...murder.Yep as seems to be the case with some people (old English ladies, mystery writers, owners of mystery book stores etc.) no matter where you go, murder and mayhem seem to ensue. They dog your footsteps. So when another horrific murder takes place near Peter and Rina and since it involves "family" and Peter is now the "policeman in the family" he gets drawn in.Of course it's not that simple, there are also huge family development to deal with along with the tragedies all around.Ms. Kellerman is a good writer as I'm sure hosts of fans have discovered before I even picked up one of her books. I think simply based on what I've read that these books will appeal to a wide range of readers based simply on their readability. She has a great storytelling skill.Recommended. Enjoy.

  • Laura Beth
    2018-09-26 10:57

    This was a great book. I enjoyed the main plot of a lost boy and Peter Decker's search for him in New York and Los Angeles. I enjoy the constantly growing relationship between Rina and Peter. I love Peter's struggling relationship with his religion and himself; how he must come to terms with who he is as a person and as a Jew and how being raised Baptist and the relationship with his adopted family is impacted by his return to his birth religion. All of this creates a depth of character that is very interesting to read. Kellerman does an excellent job at balancing a mystery/criminal procedure book with a story about a man and a woman. I love it.

  • Lavinia Kent
    2018-08-28 13:01

    I read this book years ago and enjoyed it every bit as much as I did the first time. If you haven't read Kellerman before I recommend going back to the beginning and starting with Ritual Bath. The changing/growing relationship between her hero and heroine are my favorite part of these books and Day of Atonement is no exception. Rina and Peter are newly married in this book and seeing how the learn to work with each other and deal with complicated family problems is wonderful. If I had to rate the book strictly on this part of the story line I would give it five stars. My problem is the mystery element -- in this case the search for a runaway boy. I find that it about half of Kellerman's book she gets more graphic and brutal than I care for. I've reached a point in life where I know awful things happen, but I don't always want to read about them. This is strictly a personal choice an many other readers might not feel this way. That said, even knowing that there were parts of the book I did not care for I was still eager to read it again for the wonderful relationship between Rina and Peter.

  • Simone
    2018-09-01 09:06

    I enjoyed Book 4 and I am moving on to Book 5 right away. The Peter and Rina storyline is compelling enough to keep me going, and I found this cop-plot was more interesting than the previous ones.Part of the reason why I liked this installment more than the others is because of the language - the previous books were not just rude, that wouldn’t faze me at all, but crude. Book 4 was much tamer on that front so maybe the worst is over. (As far as my memory goes, there was a total lack of toilet-talk in Book 16)

  • Nancy Groves
    2018-08-30 15:52

    The case that Decker and Lazarus pursue in this book is suspenseful, and overall I enjoyed the book. I gave it 3 stars instead of 4, however, because I just can't buy an important premise that is crucial to the plot. In this very early book in the Decker/Lazarus series, they have just gotten married and gone to visit Rina Lazarus' extended family in New York for Rosh Hashanah. Decker glimpses a group of female relatives and family friends preparing food and instantly determines that one of them is his birth mother, who gave him up for adoption some 40 years earlier. They've never met, never communicated, and as far as I could tell he'd never seen her picture. Yet somehow he knew it was her. He literally runs out of the house because he doesn't want to be near her or for anyone else to discover their relationship (she has never told her husband or their children that she had a child out of wedlock when she was just 15). Of course he has to come back, and inevitably comes face to face with his birth mother, and now SHE instantly recognizes him! I know that in some families there can be strong similarities in features and traits between children and parents or other relatives, while in others it's hard to pin down who looks like whom. But I just couldn't accept that these two strangers would both know each other right off the bat. This kinship is crucial to the plot because his birth mother's grandson has gone missing, and Decker offers to use his detective skills, getting more deeply involved than he initially planned because the boy is part of his family. To me, the entire plot rests on very shaky foundations, but aside from that it was well done.

  • Bodosika Bodosika
    2018-08-27 15:49

    This is an interesting book and I never thought I will enjoy it the way I did.I gave it 3 Stars.

  • Elizabeth
    2018-09-25 12:51

    This is one of the fairly early Faye Kellerman books taking place not too long after Rina and Decker are married.It is an exciting and is a "can't put it down" book". Besides being a great mystery it has lots of information on the Jewish culture.I loved this book!

  • Shannon
    2018-09-19 11:07

    A bit slower than the first three books in the series but still a good read.

  • aPriL does feral sometimes
    2018-09-04 08:01

    Ok. Here goes.Decker uses handcuffs on his wife because he wants her to stay in the car. There is no preliminary disagreement. He stops the car, parks it, then he handcuffs her. She is shocked. So was I. She has a gun and she knows how to shoot it, but instead of either letting her help, or calling up for backup, he goes by himself to check out two people who have murdered and robbed. When he is hurting, he won't take pain medication. He won't see a therapist, despite having PTSD from the Vietnam War. He thinks ideas like on page 339: "god damn doctors trying to pump me up with pain-killers. What'd they think he was? A goddamn girl?" He thinks stuff like this all of the time. Throughout the series that I've read up to now, whenever he feels scared, weak or unsure, he bucks himself up by berating himself to not be a woman. He's straight out of the 1950's. The problem? The story is happening in 1991. Oh, and despite losing TWO pints of blood, he won't accept blood transfusions because he's afraid of AIDs, but instead of resting, he runs around packing clothes, hustling suitcases to and from airports, and flies from Los Angeles to New York, breaking open an arterial bleed injury. Did I mention Decker was a medic in the Vietnam War?Second irritation. The phrase, 'weird smile". Over and over and over and over..... If you did a word count on that phrase, weird smile, I bet it would come out over 5o times. Kellerman sometimes alternated with crooked smile, but she didn't seem to think a thesaurus might be useful.Third irritation. Apparently, Rina is a reincarnated goddess of love, the image of Venus. Everywhere she goes, everyone gets a woody, including women. Everyone starts fantasizing about raping her. Every book in the series so far, every chapter where she meets anyone, they all stare. This book has such scenes constantly, too.Fourth irritation. Noam, a 13 year old boy raised in New York City as an ultra-orthodox Jew, runs off with a psychopath. Eventually Noam realizes he made a mistake, but what does he do? Wouldn't you guess he'd try to run away from the evil man, as ANY sane person would do? (view spoiler)[. He beats up two men by kicking and punching them on instructions from the evil Hersch, and tries to shoot the first victim, but fails because the gun had no bullets, and watches Hersch stab the victim over and over. Then, he feels so bad about committing attempted murder, over which he suffers PTSD, he can't eat or sleep and tries to commit suicide and fails, so he helps Hersch eviscerate another victim by successfully shooting him dead. Faye Kellerman, unlike her husband, the author Jonathan Kellerman, couldn't be more tone deaf in plotting realistic character development or reactions to events. She is SO tone deaf, her books are unintentionally hilarious. And annoying. And bad.(hide spoiler)]I've noticed there are people who loved The Three Stooges, and others who preferred The Marx Brothers. There usually is a preference for one kind of comedy over another, very rarely do people like them equally. Generally, people agree The Marx Brothers were more clever, cerebral and high art. This is not a judgement on the people who prefer whatever; I've known college professors who prefer The Three Stooges. To me, Faye Kellerman writes for those who prefer The Three Stooges, and Jonathan Kellerman writes for those who prefer The Marx Brothers. While these mysteries are not intentional comedies, it feels like the appropriate comparison.

  • Cindy
    2018-08-28 11:04

    Interesting and informative, well plotted and narrated. Recommended.

  • Ginger Price
    2018-09-04 11:12

    Decker & Lazarus - Book 4Peter & Rina have married and are in NY on their honeymoon meeting Rina's Orthodox Jewish family and family friends. Peter didn't expect that he would come face to face with his biological mother, Frieda Levine. (Peter was adopted at birth by a loving Baptist couple and lived in Florida). The Levine's are close friends of the Lazarus'. When teenager Noam Levine becomes missing, Peter goes in search. His search takes them back home to LA where he confronts a psychopath who has frightened Noam to do his bidding. Peter also has to confront the family he never knew. I'm enjoying how the relationship between Peter & Rena is developing, and being introduced to other family members along the way. And there is always that element of suspense in solving the crime.....even knowing that Peter & Rina will somehow survive..... there are more books in this series!

  • Anna
    2018-08-30 09:09

    The series is best enjoyed in chronological order.Decker ends up hunting down a relative of Rina's, a teenager who has escaped a close-knit religious community. Some of Rina's relatives are behaving like total dicks, which Decker supports to a very high degree... interesting characters though, and lots of things happening.

  • Faye Hope
    2018-08-28 07:44

    Second time I have read the book. It is interesting to read about the Jewish communities & their culture. I know very little about the Jewish culture, their beliefs & the Yiddish language. Some of this is talked about & explained in the book as the two main characters are Jewish.

  • Merrill
    2018-09-07 10:06

    Going back and rereading all the early books in this series...I had forgotten how good they are!

  • Heather Stewart schleicher
    2018-09-02 15:13

    I am really enjoying this series. Can't wait to read them all!!

  • Christina
    2018-09-16 14:12

    I love my Faye Kellerman mysteries. Total brain fluff. This one delves deeper into the orthodox culture of Brooklyn and paints a picture of what it's like to grow up in its confines. Bonus points for a realistic outcome for Noam.

  • Elke Koepping
    2018-09-04 07:58

    Well-written with interesting insights into the chassidic community in New York. I didn't like the shape of the relationship of the two main characters. All this "Wifey needs to stay away from my work"-shit really made me sick, cumulating in the scene where he handcuffs her to the steering wheel (*facepalm*). Plus on her side: ooooh, I was really looking for a man with a shoulder to lean on... I like Fay Kellerman's writing, hopefully the development of the protagonists goes into a more equal direction in future novels.

  • Sarah(sarahandherbookshelves)
    2018-09-25 09:58

    I am giving this a 3.5 but rounding it up. I enjoyed this but I at times got frustrated with the relationship between Decker and Rina. I feel a times they have no trust for the other (mainly Decker towards Rina).

  • Hope
    2018-09-15 09:02

    Oh, wow! The mystery was weak in this volume, but the characterizations and character development was /amazing/.

  • Diane
    2018-09-09 14:44

    I love the book on tape for all of her novels in this series. Great story - very riveting.

  • Elizabeth Swift
    2018-09-21 10:04

    another step in understanding Pete and Rina's relationship both in work and as family

  • Brandy
    2018-09-10 16:02

    I may have to get back to this one, but right now I can't seem to get into it as much as the first few Faye Kellerman books that I have read. Maybe it's the timeline--the Decker/Lazarus books are based in the 1980s and so it's difficult to reconcile current police procedural and that of the 80s.

  • Roni
    2018-08-30 14:03

    I loved it!!

  • StefanieFreigericht
    2018-09-02 11:59

    About fitting in, identity and coping (Decker Lazarus 4)If you want to just try the series, go for book no 1 (The Ritual Bath) and this, no 4, no 4 being for me the slightly better of the two, but no 1 should be needed to understand the whole context.Newlyweds Peter Decker and his wife Rina, formerly Lazarus, spend an unusual honeymoon – visiting Rina’s ex-parents-in-law: with the death of Rina’s first husband from brain cancer, they lost their son, now their grandsons Sammy and Yonkie will be raised by Rina with Pete. So the LAPD-cop wants to help Rina make them feel more comfortable, still feeling a lot out of place in the strictly jewish-orthodox enviroment in New York, standing out despite his own decision for Judaism, though for a more moderate form. Too many ghosts for the Lazarus family, leave alone the very tiny housing conditions, especially with a large man like him. It is Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year’s celebration, with Yom Kippur to come, the Day of Atonement, namegiver to the book’s title. And as if this were not tricky enough, Pete had not known that the friends to come over to the Lazarus‘ home would open a pandora’s box he had avoided ever so long. And then, the group comes to realize a troubled teenage boy is missing. Pete goes into cop-mode.There are so many things I just love about this book. There is a decent enough crime story – sometimes you get to read a story about good kids doing stupid stuff and just do not get to understand why. Here, author Kellerman clevery describes how the very protected and isolated upbringing of the young boy made him ever so much more vulnerable. Of course, the reader will get a gripping hunt – including how much footwork is included in police investigations. There even are some psycho thriller portions with the involvement of some rather gory details and very nasty crimes. And the reader will learn a lot more about Pete Decker, see him under real pressure.Kellerman, herself orthodox according to Wikipedia, has cop Decker be the one to evaluate and ponder religious matters. He is new to living by religious laws and thus more given to criticism. So when he escapes the claustrophobic situation at the Lazarus‘ home, his thoughts are: „Just a hundred years ago, hundreds of Jews had poured into America, working ninety hours a week for a better life, for a chance to get out of the ghetto. But for some, so much freedom had seemed too frightening.Solution: Why not bring the ghetto into America?And Rina chose this voluntarily.“ p. 21The book gives you a wonderful insight again into religious rituals, this time the aforementioned holy days, not without backing this up with the differences for the various religous groups and some further details. I really enjoy if a crime story goes deeper and gives you some more more of a grip to matters of society and had dearly missed that type of information in book no 3. Kellerman intertwines the purpose of Yom Kippur wonderfully and tightly with the events around the disappearance, so no way of one being just the stooge for the other. To the protagonists, religion and everyday activity, it’s all linked. To the story, each carries the other along, without lecturing. And not to forget the irony behind some of the events, like when Pete tries to talk his wife out of wishing to possess a gun for self defence:Peter: “If you sell the gun.“„Peter, it should be my decision, not yours.“„You’re my wife! According to Jewish law, I bought you.“Rina glared at him: „I hate when you use religion to prove a point.“ p 158 Not the only time when Peter really messes up badly…

  • Heather
    2018-09-03 08:12

    This was the 4th book in the Peter Decker/Rina Lazarus series and quite frankly, if this had been the first one I'd read, I don't know that I'd read any of the others. In the first book, "The Ritual Bath," it is established that Rina is a young widowed Orthodox Jew with two small boys. Peter was adopted and raised Baptist but his birth parents were Jewish, which leads the way for these two characters to end up together.This installment of the series begins with L.A.-based Peter and Rina on their honeymoon-which they are spending celebrating Rosh Hashanah in New York with Rina's late husband's family. Based on personal experience, the first issue I had with the story was the reference early on to the Lazarus family as Rina's "ex-in-laws."The plot itself was interesting. At an extended gathering, Peter realizes the best friend of Rina's first mother-in-law is his biological mother, Freida Levine, which she also realizes. Freida's family, including her husband, has no idea Peter exists and they decide it's best to keep it that way. Freida doesn't want to cause pain to her family, especially her husband who thought she was "pure" when they married, and as far as Peter is concerned, his family lives in Florida. Nevertheless, this provides an emotional undercurrent for the rest of the story.Preparing for a family meal, it is discovered Noam, the oldest child of Ezra and Breina Levine (Peter's biological brother and sister-in-law), is missing. The other kids are interviewed and it's realized Noam walked to temple with the family but did not actually attend services. Of course, being that he's a detective specializing in missing children, Peter finds himself looking for the missing boy, a search that ultimately takes him and Rina back to L.A. to hunt down Noam and the dangerous psychopath he's run away from home with. Kellerman did a good job of conveying the emotional aspect of the characters in that Freida feels Noam is missing as payback for giving up Peter. Peter is torn because this is supposed to be his honeymoon and therefore he's wants to walk away but at the same time, this is technically family even if he feels no connection to these strangers, nor does he particularly want to. And Rina wants to help her husband because she knows Noam and wants to bring him safely back to his family.Rina wanting to help results in her making stupid choices, often in direct defiance to her husband's (the trained professional) wishes and then internalizing how mad he was going to be at her. Which he should be for potentially putting herself in harm's way. But what made me feel I wouldn't continue the series if this was the first book I read was that Peter came across as an emotionally abusive spouse (huh?!) and at times actually was verbally abusive to Rina and to her sons. Admittedly, it's been awhile since I read the first three books but this felt out of character. Peter may be gruff, but prior to this, he's always been a likeable character.I will definitely read the next book but if it continues down this path of Peter being so unlikeable, I will sadly have to abandon the series.

  • Chris
    2018-09-06 12:08

    another reviwer. Here goes.Decker uses handcuffs on his wife because he wants her to stay in the car. There is no preliminary disagreement. He stops the car, parks it, then he handcuffs her. She is shocked. So was I. She has a gun and she knows how to shoot it, but instead of either letting her help, or calling up for backup, he goes by himself to check out two people who have murdered and robbed. When he is hurting, he won't take pain medication. He won't see a therapist, despite having PTSD from the Vietnam War. He thinks ideas like on page 339: "god damn doctors trying to pump me up with pain-killers. What'd they think he was? A goddamn girl?" He thinks stuff like this all of the time. Throughout the series that I've read up to now, whenever he feels scared, weak or unsure, he bucks himself up by berating himself to not be a woman. He's straight out of the 1950's. The problem? The story is happening in 1991. Oh, and despite losing TWO pints of blood, he won't accept blood transfusions because he's afraid of AIDs, but instead of resting, he runs around packing clothes, hustling suitcases to and from airports, and flies from Los Angeles to New York, breaking open an arterial bleed injury. Did I mention Decker was a medic in the Vietnam War?Second irritation. The phrase, 'weird smile". Over and over and over and over..... If you did a word count on that phrase, weird smile, I bet it would come out over 5o times. Kellerman sometimes alternated with crooked smile, but she didn't seem to think a thesaurus might be useful.Third irritation. Apparently, Rina is a reincarnated goddess of love, the image of Venus. Everywhere she goes, everyone gets a woody, including women. Everyone starts fantasizing about raping her. Every book in the series so far, every chapter where she meets anyone, they all stare. This book has such scenes constantly, too.Fourth irritation. Noam, a 13 year old boy raised in New York City as an ultra-orthodox Jew, runs off with a psychopath. Eventually Noam realizes he made a mistake, but what does he do? Wouldn't you guess he'd try to run away from the evil man, as ANY sane person would do? [. He beats up two men by kicking and punching them on instructions from the evil Hersch, and tries to shoot the first victim, but fails because the gun had no bullets, and watches Hersch stab the victim over and over. Then, he feels so bad about committing attempted murder, over which he suffers PTSD, he can't eat or sleep and tries to commit suicide and fails, so he helps Hersch eviscerate another victim by successfully shooting him dead.

  • Patty Johnson-Valtierra
    2018-09-11 10:02

    Can't get enough of this series!

  • Andrew
    2018-08-26 15:44

    My commute to and from work has recently been eased by listening to the Audio CD version of Faye Kellerman’s “Day of Atonement”. This is the 4th book in the series, and while I liked this look into the lives of (now newlywed) Peter Decker and Rina Lazarus, it did not grab me as much as the previous 3. Why not? (Without any spoilers more significant than would be included in a typical cover blurb)1) The size and/or the pacing. The reading of the book took up 10 full CDs, at an estimated 70 minutes each. I didn’t feel there was enough substance to justify a full 10 CDs (or the equivalent page count). I think the book accurately reflected the police process of investigating and tracking down leads – not all of them destined to pan out to anything – but as any honest detective will admit, that process is not as exciting as they make it appear on cop shows. 2) The majority of the book was devoted to tracking down a runaway. Eventually, the characters encountered the more serious crimes that are the basis of most murder mysteries, but the first of those does not occur until well past the ½ point of the book. Perhaps if the crime spree started a bit earlier??3) Approximately half of the book takes place in the Jewish sections of Brooklyn. Unfortunately, our narrator, Mitchell Greenberg, was not able to significantly alter his tone of voice to differentiate between the characters who resided in that area, at least not without losing the accent. To me, every local male over the age of 40 sounded just like Jackie Mason – to the point where I wondered if they got Mr. Mason to make an uncredited guest appareance!4) There was too much tension and not enough affection expressed between our lead characters. Perhaps the author was trying to warn us that this is what happens when you devote your honeymoon to solving a possible crime – a family missing person – instead of more traditional activities. BUT I did not feel the same pull between Peter and Rina in this novel as I did during the first 3 – and not coincidentally, I did not LIKE them as much as I did during the first three books.Despite all of this, I consider “Day of Atonement” to be a good book. My issue is that the first 3 books in the series were GREAT, so simply “good” is a step in the wrong direction.

  • Alex
    2018-08-29 09:52

    "Day of Atonement" is a Jewish murder mystery which means that someone gets murdered and the Jewish community becomes involved in solving it in some way. I've read a number of these Faye Kellerman mysteries and the early novels involving the "Rina Lazarus" character are pretty good but the later ones tend to overlook the specifically Jewish aspects of the mystery which I enjoy. The story: Detective Peter Decker and Rina Larazus are newlyweds who have returned to Bourough Park to spend their honeymoon and Rosh Hashana with Rina's family... who are looking at Rina's new husband as an outsider... though not rejecting him. In the midst of family turmoil a young family member, Noam, goes missing. Has he been kidnapped by a psychotic killer or is he just a runaway, escaping the pressure of family living in an Orthodox Jewish community?OK... this is an adult novel. Weird, sick stuff happens. It's a murder mystery and generally murderers are not nice people so let's get that straight right now. There is cursing in this novel so if your virgin eyes can't handle an F-U or two then skip this one. I liked this novel because the author delves into issues concerning Jewish ritual. If you already know what the issues are regarding holiday festival observance you will appreciate the detail. If not, it may be lost on you why people are fretting over whether they should use the car to search the neighborhood or write notes as they interview people on the festival.The ending is satisfying. The conflict between Peter and Rina is pretty good. They act like a newly married couple... loving but still trying to find compromise between their previous independent lives and marriage. I like Rina's balance between modesty in the Orthodox sense and pushing for her position as an equal partner in her marriage and in the public sphere. She is not a china doll. Good stuff.