Read Sanctuary by Faye Kellerman Online

sanctuary

A diamond dealer and his entire family have mysteriously disappeared from their sprawling Las Angeles manor, leaving the estate undisturbed and their valuables untouched. Investigating detective Decker is stumped--faced with a perplexing case riddled with dead ends. Then a second dealer is found murdered in Manhatten, catapulting Decker and his wife, Rina, into a heartstopA diamond dealer and his entire family have mysteriously disappeared from their sprawling Las Angeles manor, leaving the estate undisturbed and their valuables untouched. Investigating detective Decker is stumped--faced with a perplexing case riddled with dead ends. Then a second dealer is found murdered in Manhatten, catapulting Decker and his wife, Rina, into a heartstopping maze of murder and intrigue that spans the globe...only to touch down dangerously in their own backyard....

Title : Sanctuary
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780380724970
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 432 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Sanctuary Reviews

  • Brina
    2018-08-26 09:00

    In this latest installment featuring Peter and Rina Decker, we see diamond dealer Arik Yalom and his wife Dalia murdered and his sons fleeing the country. Meanwhile, one of Rina's former school friends Honey Klein has come to visit with her children. Klein appears distressed and her children forelorn, causing Peter to question if this was a pleasure visit or an escape. This book appears to me as a transition book in the series. Peter and Marge have a new position in homicide under a lieutenant who plays strictly by the book. At home, Sammy and Jake have switched to a more modern yeshiva that teaches English so they have the option of going to college one day should they wish. Baby Hannah is growing up quickly, freeing up Rina to accomplish more, including helping Peter with his work. Sure enough, after questioning all those associated with the Yalom case, Peter and Marge have reason to believe that the boys have gone to Israel. Additionally, Honey Klein's rental car is found abandoned near the airport, leaving Rina to think that she must have fled to Israel as well. A nice touch is that Detective Milo Sturgis is mentioned in passing, leaving me to believe that they could collaborate on future cases. Peter on his own money goes to Israel to investigate with Rina coming along to translate, and suffice it to say this was not a site seeing trip. This particular book read more like a thriller focused on police rather than home life. Where it did touch on the Deckers growing up as a family, Kellerman took Rina out of her role as homemaker and into a police setting. With a long series we can be prepared for each book to focus on something different- the family, religion, a tough case. Even though the books are intriguing and could stand alone, they are best read in chronological order because life moves on in between each case. I'm in this for the long haul and look forward to the next book in the series.

  • Jennifer
    2018-09-25 13:46

    I read this book for my mystery book club, it is the 7th in the Peter Decker / Rina Lazarus series by Faye Kellerman. Rina is an Orthodox Jew and her husband, Peter, converted to Judaism, which I’m thinking must have happened in the previous books. I had a hard time reading this book since there were so many Hebrew words used throughout, which slowed down the pace and understanding of exactly what was going on. There were 2 mysteries going on, one involving Rina’s high school friend, Honey Klein; and the other involving the disappearance of a diamond dealer and his family. The mystery eventually takes the couple to Israel, which just increased the amount of Hebrew words and context, and added the history of Israel and the religious cultures that reside there. I read some of the other reviews of earlier books in this series, and it appears that they all follow the same pattern – deeply religious under tones and men being superior to women (sometimes just subtle hints). I probably won’t read any more books by Faye Kellerman, but would like to read a book by her husband, Jonathan Kellerman… it sounds like his books center around the mystery without as much romance, history, and religion.

  • Jaqi
    2018-09-21 13:40

    I love this series, so far, but this was not my favorite story. It was well written, just person preference that you like some better than others. Love the main characters as usual, but didn't dig the secondary characters as much as usual. Did love the cameo from detective Sturgis. On to the next one.

  • Maiesha
    2018-09-10 08:54

    I was really hoping that I would like this book, since so many people I know had recommended Kellerman as a master of the mystery genre, but I was quite disappointed with this novel. This will likely be the last Faye Kellerman book I read. First, it was about 100-150 pages too long. I have no issue whatsoever with lengthy books with the level of detail and scope that justifies their length (The Golden Notebook and Dune are both favorites of mine). While I can't point to specific characters or subplots that needed trimming, the overall pace of the book is off. There are tons of meandering descriptions and character musings that are overstuffed and plodding, and then sudden "insights" that usually Decker and Rina or Marge come up with as they bounce hypotheses off of each other. These exchanges are too sudden and difficult to follow after such lengthy set-ups. I often found myself thinking "where didthatcome from?" when I rarely have trouble following complex plots. I found myself skimming a few pages at a time just to get to the point!Secondly, I just didn't enjoy Decker as a character, nor did I enjoy his relationship with Rina. Decker just isn't very interesting. He's a "hard boiled" detective who has been through some personal issues, but he never becomes a three-dimensional person, just a cardboard character who does just about what you would expect him to do in the kinds of situations you would expect him to find himself in. And his marriage to Rina is rendered as more parental than equal. Decker is often angry or annoyed at Rina, semi-patronizingly indulging a hunch she has, or comforting her when she's frightened, which she isa lot . I get that Rina is younger and Orthodox, and thus has been somewhat sheltered, and also that she is not a detective with the requisite training, but her child-like need and his gruff impatience just reminded me of a testy father and his spunky daughter who keeps getting too big for her britches. This dynamic got boring really quickly!Thirdly, there are a few howlers in regards to logical leaps within the plot. I am so sure that Decker would have been swiftly approved to take his investigation to Israel and that his captain would be fine with his wife as his official interpreter (not a spoiler--this info is on the book jacket). Yeahhhh....just no! There are other leaps that are not quite this bad, but do make the overall story weaker, as you have trouble believing the characters' motivations or ability to intuit information that just doesn't quite hold water.While I did find the information about Orthodox beliefs and culture very interesting, the sporadic use of Yiddish phrases was sometimes enlightening, sometimes off-putting. I have no idea how common peppering English with Yiddish happens among Orthodox Jews, but it began to feel like a gimmick at times. I also enjoyed that there were a few surprises that I did not see coming, and those twists were well-played. Kellerman does have chops as a writer, especially when she manages to keep her descriptions brief and economical, but she seems to get too cute and bogged down in her little tricks. I have heard from others that this book is one of her weaker Decker/Lazarus novels, and I am willing to believe that it is. I amnotwilling to try again at over 400 pages, though!

  • Ella Burakowski
    2018-08-27 10:42

    After reading a very large intense book, I chose Sanctuary as my “in between” read, thinking it would be easy and light. I was pleasantly surprised to have really enjoyed it. In the beginning I thought it was a little hokey with just too much Jewish background, but I soon came to realize it was all an integral part of the entire plot. This murder-mystery deals with the diamond industry, and takes the reader from Los Angeles to Israel. When dealing with billions of dollars, there’s bound to be thievery, cheating, murder, suspense, throw in a little middle-east politics and you have a recipe for a great story. I have only read one other Faye Kellerman book which was years ago so I cannot compare, but Sanctuary can stand on it’s own merits. You don’t have to read any of the other Peter Decker/Rina series to enjoy this one. There are enough plot twists to engage any reader.Having been to Israel and understanding many of the places described in the book was an added bonus. The accurate descriptions of the many different kinds of people from black-hat orthodox, to PLO terrorist, to holocaust survivor, to an L.A. police sergeant – all well done.There was an extensive overuse of Hebrew and Yiddish words throughout the book, which may be off-putting to someone not familiar with those languages. I also felt there was just too many wasted words about Peter and Rina’s baby Hanna. I assume their side story is the common thread that makes these books a series, but I found it distracting and annoying.Mitchell Greenberg the narrator was awesome. He pronounced every one of those Hebrew and Yiddish words perfectly, adding authenticity to the story. He changed his accent so many times to suit the characters; everything from Israeli yeshiva boys, to Orthodox old men, to Israeli women and the list goes on. He did a superb job with the inflections of all the characters.

  • Laura Beth
    2018-08-26 08:41

    Two mysteries for the price of one....I loved this story and I am really enjoying this series. I have been in a reading funk and not sure what the problem is. I have been working my way through many series, this one included. When I return to this series I always enjoy myself and loose myself in the world of Decker, his wife Rina, and his partner Marge. I also loved the shout out that Faye Kellerman gave to her husband when Decker gave a call to a West LA cop named Sturgiss (for those who haven't you need to read J. Kellerman's Novels with Detective Sturgiss and psychologist Alex Delaware). The story of the murder of a diamond seller and his wife in LA and the murder of a diamond seller in NYC overlap and give a wonderful plot to read and enjoy. Decker and Rina end up flying to Israel to solve this case.

  • Magpie67
    2018-09-21 11:04

    Stunning story revolved around diamonds... what does religion and diamonds have in common... A lot when you involve the Jewish diamond sellers, buyers and cutters and the country of Israel and South Africa. Brilliant, witty writing from Faye, of course, I learn something new every time I dive into her series with Peter Decker and Rina. Love that I learn about history, religion and crime solving with rich characters. Suspense wrapped up into a package of dynamite when the PLO is involved. The sad thing... the spiritual and emotional dramas are still in play with Jerusalem, the Gaza Strip, Hebron, and other landmarks of Christianity. Faye Kellerman makes me, the reader, feel like a scholar as I flip through the pages to learn more about a culture as old as the first story in the Bible. Fascinating, murder mystery that wraps around a devious plot of greed. Peter Decker and Harry Bosch are my all time heros!

  • Katie
    2018-08-27 11:47

    Great read. Loved the excursion to Israel. Loved the conversation about gets, but not necessarily the story line of it. I mean the conversation they had about it while in Israel was fantastic. However, watching the story line play out was unsettling. Both murders fell in that gray area where I'm not really sure how I feel. There just isn't an easy answer to either of the situations. Was it right or was it condoning? And was there enough closure? My second favorite in series so far.

  • Nelleke Plouffe
    2018-09-15 09:07

    I appreciated this book for the look into Jewish culture. I liked the main characters, too. However, to me it lacked something as a mystery. The detectives' main method seems to be throwing wild theories around and hoping something ends up making sense. I just didn't find this believable.

  • Kristin
    2018-09-26 08:52

    I think this book was my favorite in the whole series so far. A good mix of religious knowledge, connection to Rina dn her family/community AND a good detective story.

  • Marita
    2018-08-26 15:52

    another good one

  • Cindy
    2018-09-21 07:58

    Like the series - always well plotted and narrated. Recommended.

  • StefanieFreigericht
    2018-09-04 14:05

    Cutting a Window to See How the Grain Runs“…when Honey asked if she and the kids might spend a week with Rina and her family in Los Angeles, Rina thought it strange.“ p 3 Rina Decker’s former classmate Honey Klein married to an ultra-religious Leibbener Chasidic and they rather maintained a very sporadic contact. Now out of the blue, she wants to drop by for a week with only two days‘ notice. The two women’s lifestyles are different: In Honey’s world, there are no TVs or private phones in the houses, no popular fiction or magazines. No phones is a first even to Rina. And Rina, since she married LAPD cop Pete, kind of shifted from orthodox more to modern orthodox Judaism.At the same time, Pete follows his partner Marge Dunn on a lead to the house of a family that disappeared; husband, wife, two sons in the middle of the school year. Nothing seems to have been searched, nothing taken but the boys passports. Might they have done harm to their parents? Or has the whole family fled? But – why? The husband is a wealthy diamond dealer as is Honey’s husband. Is it a mere coincidence when Honey cannot reach her husband? All the while, Pete and Marge, lately transferred from Juvey to Homicide, have to deal with the snide remarks from their new „Loo“ (Lieutenant) – on women and “niceties“ such as “Looks like the Jews know to hold a buck.“ p 133. But fortunately, Pete and Rina know what a mezuzah is for https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mezuzah Author Faye Kellerman tried for something completely new with this one – the routine police procedural was added up with elements in between economic crime, adventure and international/political conspiracy. She has me in with that mix. It turns out with Pete and Rina travelling to Israel, as all traits seem to be leading there, to the namegiving “Sanctuary“ for all Jews, has in it lots of background related to the diamond business and considerations on Jewish marriage and divorce (a nice idea to have a Rabbi go and beat your to-be-ex-husband if he is unwilling to agree with a divorce…) as well as on some of the very different ways of religious approaches in Judaism. Unfortunately, the next four books of the series are missing in my collection. Well, they do as of TODAY4,5 out of 5 stars (half a star off as some of the adventure/political parts are a slight bit too exaggerated – though I admit I would love to see those in a movie)

  • Cathy
    2018-09-21 13:59

    I love a series where characters grow. The relationship between Peter and Rina comes across as believable and interesting.Sanctuary was a very meaty book, deep and challenging but rewarding. I look forward to continuing the series.

  • Alf Goodall
    2018-09-12 14:44

    If I recall correctly, this is the first of the series in which Rina actively works with Peter to solve a crime, where her fluency in Hebrew and knowledge of Israel are particularly valuable.

  • Isidore Teitelbaum
    2018-09-15 09:02

    Great read. Enjoyed it thoroughlyIntricate storyline but fast paced. Very entertaining. I am going to start reading t h e r d st of this series.

  • Anna
    2018-09-09 14:57

    Decker-series books are best enjoyed in chronological order, as the characters live and develop in and between the books.In this one, Decker investigates the case of a missing Israeli family consisting of diamond sellers and their teenaged sons. To keep his family life out of balance, Rina's high school friend, with whom she hasn't talked with for many years, comes over for a surprise visit with her children, all amazed by everything they haven't seen in their 18th century inspired, even more orthodox Jewish village somewhere in NY. When Decker and Marge discover the bodies of the missing parents, Decker somehow convinces his loo to send him over to Israel to locate the missing or escaped teenagers.The first Decker I read was way out of order, Cold Case (also sold as The Mercedes Coffin). I found Rina particularly annoying because of her fixated, unquestioned religious views, but when then going back in the series from the beginning, at least she becomes less radical and develops a bit. Yet "because I choose to believe so" is a weak argument for maintaining a lifestyle. What I like in Faye Kellerman's books is the the details and the characters. There are a lot of detail about the orthodox Judaism and their lifestyle. So while most stories happen in LA, it's not the same LA that's with all the noir out there, it's of a subculture. In most books there is an interesting combination of bizarre characters that keep the story interesting. In this one the characters didn't seem that bizarre - they simply reminded me of many Israeli customers I've had to work with in the past. Rude, demanding, and expecting a princess treatment from everyone else. The sister of the killed diamond seller is rude, the family members of them are rude, many of the law enforcement people when they visit Israel have The Attitude. That culture bound attitude was captured very well.What I also liked was the detail of small things in Israel, the things Decker sees as a tourist. That trip and the continuous, age-specific details about observing the children grow up reflect quite a bit what was on for the author in her life. What I didn't like in this particular story would include the abundance of rude people and people with attitudes; the assumptions by some that a religious cult can have their own rules above the laws of the country they reside in; the weakness of how they actually managed to get an approval for the work trip in Israel; treating all Muslims as inferior (as how all Muslims were presented in the story). Oh, and Rina's stupidity in driving around Israel alone to the Muslim quarters of the country would hit that as well. The plot is weak even when it tries to shoot big. There's too much about explaining and detailing the Jewish classical morals and how those would dictate whether someone is guilty or not and how the traditional Jewish divorce can or can not be given. Irrelevant page fillers for a procedural. She can write, this just isn't one of the greatest in the series.

  • Pam
    2018-09-08 10:50

    Love reading Kaye Kellerman's book but this was not one of my favorite. Tedious in parts - but worth the read.

  • Alex
    2018-09-01 11:37

    "Sanctuary" is a Jewish murder mystery. In this case someone MIGHT be murdered and he is Jewish. A Jewish detective is placed on the case to find him and the missing family. This was a pretty good read. I really liked it.The story: A Jewish diamond dealer is reported missing along with his wife and two sons. Detective Peter Decker is investigating along with his partner, Marge, who is trying to make her way up the ladder and getting a lot of guff. Decker's wife, Rina Lazarus, also gets involved as the case takes him to Israel chasing down the missing boys.OK... does someone die? You bet. Is it gruesome? Well... it's not pretty but it is not described in detail. Is there any cursing? Some. Not too often. Can kids read this book? Hmmm... no... maybe older teens if you don't mind them learning that people get killed but it's not any worse than a TV murder mystery. They do discuss adultery though. Just so you know.I like this story because it talks about certain Jewish issues including the plight of the agunah (the anchored woman) who cannot get a divorce until her husband relents and gives her a divorce (a "get"). It is a side story to be sure but I was grateful it was included. It added to the story and supported it. It was not just thrown in there.Complaints? Yes. While the ending was satisfying, there is a part toward the end where the author, through the voice of Peter Decker, editorializes. It is brief and OK as far as it goes, but if you are going to bring up a controversial subject at the end you ought to discuss it thoroughly or not at all. I think the author offered a quick solution (through Peter Decker) to a controversial issue without mentioning the utterly unforgivable and uncorrectable chaos such a solution would create....which is partly why the situation persists because the solutions are few and not easy at all. The author did an injustice to the reader in that sense, but one can ignore that misstep at the end and enjoy the novel as I did.

  • Bonnie
    2018-09-04 10:59

    I have to give it a three because although I finished the book only two months ago (I’m behind in my reviewing), I had a difficult time remembering the end. I remembered the rest of the book but had to go back and re-read the ending before finishing my review. Guess that does not say much for the book. Not memorable.People have said that they are tired of all the Jewish terminology in Kellerman’s books but I find it fascinating. In this book there is more than usual because Decker and his wife, Rena, actually go to Israel. I found parts of the Jewish heritage very interesting such as Rena realizing that the one Rabi was an imposter by the way he phrased things. Rena plays a bigger role in this book than others.The part of the book about the diamond industry was not particularly interesting to me because I have learned so much about the industry, even the seedy underworld part, from the history channel and other TV shows. The diamond industry comes into play as a subplot because Decker is working on a case in LA in which a wealthy diamond merchant and his entire family have disappeared. Rena also has a friend from NY whose husband is a diamond merchant and he is murdered. Rena’s friend, Honey, and her children then also disappear.I guess that I initially did not remember the ending because I did not like it. It seemed to be out of place or unconnected with the majority of the story.

  • Chris
    2018-08-28 11:48

    another reviewI had a difficult time remembering the end. I remembered the rest of the book but had to go back and re-read the ending before finishing my review. Guess that does not say much for the book. Not memorable.People have said that they are tired of all the Jewish terminology in Kellerman’s books but I find it fascinating. In this book there is more than usual because Decker and his wife, Rena, actually go to Israel. I found parts of the Jewish heritage very interesting such as Rena realizing that the one Rabi was an imposter by the way he phrased things. Rena plays a bigger role in this book than others.The part of the book about the diamond industry was not particularly interesting to me because I have learned so much about the industry, even the seedy underworld part, from the history channel and other TV shows. The diamond industry comes into play as a subplot because Decker is working on a case in LA in which a wealthy diamond merchant and his entire family have disappeared. Rena also has a friend from NY whose husband is a diamond merchant and he is murdered. Rena’s friend, Honey, and her children then also disappear.I guess that I initially did not remember the ending because I did not like it. It seemed to be out of place or unconnected with the majority of the story.(less)

  • Ed
    2018-09-11 14:06

    #7 in the Peter Decker / Rina Lazarus mystery series.Peter Decker / Rina Lazarus mystery - Orthodox Jewish housewife Rina Lazarus and her husband-and convert to Judaism-LAPD Detective Sergeant Peter Decker have their hands full. While Peter and his partner, Det. Marge Dunn, investigate the disappearance of diamond dealer Arik Yalom, his wife and their teenage sons, Rina plays hostess to Honey Klein, visiting from New York with her children and obviously escaping problems with her Hasidic diamond-dealer husband, Gershon. When the bodies of the older Yaloms are found buried on a local mountainside, their sons are seen as possible suspects or potential victims fleeing for their lives. The Yalom case leads Peter to L.A.'s diamond center; to elegant Kate Milligan, a power in the South African diamond trade; and eventually to Israel, with Rina along as interpreter. After Gershon Klein is found dead, Honey and her kids vanish too. Scouring the environs of Jerusalem in their search for the missing Yalom boys, turning up bomb plots as they go, Peter and Rina get a fix on the killer and take an inside look at some Israeli institutions.

  • Sherri F.
    2018-09-17 10:43

    Probably close to 4.5 but it might b/c of my Decker/Lazarus withdrawal lately. I love this series and this was another good one. It has two simulataneously and possibly related crimes intermingled with the personal lives...awww Hannah is 9 months already!Decker & Marge are at their new station & division and Marge disappointed that she isn't getting the good cases and thinks she's getting another weak one and it turns into a missing family, which turns in missing/murder case related to the diamond industry and a family with connections to Israel. At same time, a high school classmate (who now belongs to a strict, super-orthodox community in NY) of Rina's calls and wants to visit, her family issues also and concidentally, her friend's husband is in the diamond industry too. Halfway through both lead Pete and Rina to Israel & all kinds of situations [it's more good cultural learning for me & a reminder of the way things were in that part of the world in the mid-90s, plus adds to my World Read challenge].This is a definite if you like the series, but it's also a good one for anyone (and a good one to read even if early books in the series haven't been read).

  • Sherree
    2018-09-11 11:40

    A very strange story with the coincidences of two diamond dealers and their families disappearing. I was paying attention, while reading this book, to Faye Kellerman's descriptions of people who appeared one or more times. This is a pretty early book. The ones I have read from later go into excruciating detail about what everyone is wearing (for some reason I always seem to particularly notice the description of Marge and Oliver's clothing everyday). I wonder when this started, since it wasn't present from the beginning. Jonathan Kellerman, on the other hand, who does the same thing, seems to have done it from the beginning of his writing. Did Faye start doing it after she began writing with her husband? The books would be quite a bit shorter without the minute detail of everyone's facial construction, body type, clothes, etc.That's really nothing to do with this book, as it's not present there. I like the book, I look forward to reading another Faye Kellerman book.

  • Mirrordance
    2018-09-15 08:01

    Una nuova avventura di Peter Decker ambientata all'interno delle comunità ortodossa. Questa volta si sposta addirittura in Israele per seguire un mistero che si intreccia con gli affari di un commerciante di diamanti. queste indagini si intrecciano con la scomparsa/assassinio di un altro commerciante di diamanti, la cui moglie è una compagna di infanzia di sua moglie. All'inizio puo' sorgere il duccio che le due storie possano avere tratti in comune, in realtà l'unico aspetto comune è il profondo sentire lo stato di Israele come casa e ciomunità in cui tornare nel momento del bisogno/pericolo. Le due storie si intrecciano e dipanano fino a scigliere nodi e misteri e scoprire due risoluzioni differenti. La storia offre lo spunto per approfondire alcuni aspetti dell'ebraismo ortodosso e per portarci in medio oriente.

  • Debbie
    2018-09-10 07:43

    I like this author and have been going back and reading the first books that were written about Decker and his wife. The books that Ms. Kellerman writes are an easy read, and you feel that you are right there in the story.

  • Katherine
    2018-09-06 08:01

    I really enjoyed this early Peter Decker book. It isn't as visceral and overtly gripping as some of the other books, however it is thoughtful and intriguing from the start. The plot centres around parallel disappearances of diamond dealers and their families and I was particularly impressed by the structure Faye Kellerman uses, with the first part of the book set in LA as we expect and the second half in Israel. Peter is totally out of his comfort zone in Tel Aviv and relies very much on Rina - who has an adventure herself. Really good book, as I say, not as fast paced as some of the other books in the series, but this is made up for by a thoughtful edge and some surprising insights into the world and mind-set of certain ultra-orthodox Jewish communities. Really good.

  • Susan Ackland
    2018-09-08 11:42

    This was my second Faye Kellerman. I haven't been a serial reader of one particular author for many years -- it's a practice I secretly disapprove of. Nevertheless, she has me hooked. "Sanctuary" involved murders within the Jewish part of the diamond industry and it was interesting to learn a bit about that "story." There was a secondary plot involving the ultra-orthodox community and the issues raised when a man refuses to give his wife a divorce. Ultimately the plot went over the top and became unbelievable, but I had enough fun along the way that I didn't hold it against the author and I'm now half-way through her book "The Serpent's Tooth."

  • Fredrick Danysh
    2018-08-26 10:03

    LAPD Sergeant Peter Decker investigate the disappearance of a family that is in the diamond business. After another diamond merchant is found murdered, Decker and his partner search for the family on their own time. They find the buried bodies of the couple but the sons are missing. An old friend of Decker's wife visits with her children and disappear. The her husband's body is discovered in New York City. Decker and his wife make a trip to Israel looking for the missing boys. Others are also searching for them. A good read except for the intense attention paid by the author to fashion details and her misconception regarding firearms. Pistols have magazines not clips.

  • Wanda
    2018-09-21 12:49

    Combines two mysteries in the same book that are sort of related. Both involve people involved in the diamond business with ties to Israel. Lots of Jewish history, culture and religious practices described. Peter gets involved looking for some missing people and find the parents dead and the children missing. He eventually tracks them to Israel and finds out why they were being hunted and who killed the parents. Meanwhile a friend of his wife comes to town with her children and then go missing. Her husband has been killed in New York and they search for her and his killer and it also leads them to Israel.