Read Vernacular Architecture by Henry Glassie Online

vernacular-architecture

Based on thirty-five years of fieldwork, Glassie's Vernacular Architecture synthesizes a career of concern with traditional building. He articulates the key principles of architectural analysis, and then, centering his argument in the United States, but drawing comparative examples from many locations in Europe and Asia, he shows how architecture can be a prime resource foBased on thirty-five years of fieldwork, Glassie's Vernacular Architecture synthesizes a career of concern with traditional building. He articulates the key principles of architectural analysis, and then, centering his argument in the United States, but drawing comparative examples from many locations in Europe and Asia, he shows how architecture can be a prime resource for the one who would write a democratic and comprehensive history....

Title : Vernacular Architecture
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ISBN : 9780253213952
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 200 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Vernacular Architecture Reviews

  • Theeng
    2018-11-29 05:48

    Henry Glassie is considered the father of the study of vernacular architecture. Having heard that his early books are tedious, detailed examinations of buildings, I am surprised at how casually written (no footnotes!) and broad this is. He argues that the definition of vernacular architecture should be expanded beyond "folk" housing, but the examples he includes hardly support his assertion. At one point he notes that industrial production exaggerates the characteristics of vernacular architecture. I hoped he would expand upon this observation, but ultimately he did not. Strangely, Glassie also attempts to formulate three historical periods of architecture in America in the second part of the book. It sounds like I didn't like reading this much, but what makes it a worthwhile read is the first half, in which he shares personal stories that demonstrate the ways in which houses have lived histories.

  • Azimuth
    2018-12-08 06:03

    I agree with the historical account of how we progressed from community to individual life, which seemingly does pair with the move from sacred to secular. And I agree that the lack of community, which is still prevalent in say Italy, is a detriment to our lives today. However, I would argue that what we have lost in community we have made up for many times over with other gains. And so I would argue that Glassie is to opposed to the path we have taken out of principal, without truly weighting all of the added benefits our individualistic innovative society has produced.

  • Isaac Timm
    2018-11-22 10:43

    Glasse sometime wonders a bit, but his book has a lot of good solid information.