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Translators have done their best to render the words of the Bible into English, but capturing the nuances of the ancient languages is an inexact science. Kent gives readers an opportunity to investigate the roots and biblical context of the words within the Word. "Deeper into the Word" is a fascinating devotional, but it can also be used as an accessible reference tool, asTranslators have done their best to render the words of the Bible into English, but capturing the nuances of the ancient languages is an inexact science. Kent gives readers an opportunity to investigate the roots and biblical context of the words within the Word. "Deeper into the Word" is a fascinating devotional, but it can also be used as an accessible reference tool, as it explores 100 of the most important words of the New Testament. Kent unpacks each word's Greek origins, shows how it is used in the Bible, and offers insights into its significance in our lives....

Title : Deeper into the Word: Reflections on 100 Words From the New Testament
Author :
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ISBN : 9780764208423
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Deeper into the Word: Reflections on 100 Words From the New Testament Reviews

  • Susy Flory
    2019-05-17 05:47

    When Oprah reads a book and talks about it on the air, she often refers to having “a-ha!” moments. Keri Wyatt Kent’s new book, Deeper Into the Word: New Testament” was chockfull of a-ha moments for me. If you’re like me and you’ve heard your share of sermons and Bible lessons over the years, Keri’s book will help scrub off the dust and grime of over-familiarity with well known biblical texts and give them a fresh gleam. For those who are newer to studying and tangling with biblical texts, Deeper Into the Word: Reflections on 100 Words From the New Testament will introduce and demonstrate the idea of a “word study,” which means to stop and take a closer look at the meaning of a particular word and attempt to fully understand what the author meant when using that word. Kent has chosen 100 words that appear in the Bible, such as Blind, Bread, Church, Disciple, Friend, Pharisee, Religion, Sabbath, Water, and Yoke. For each word, she gives the most common interpretation, often accompanied by a personal anecdote, then goes into a quick look at the word in the original Hebrew, Greek, or Aramaic. Then comes the fun: Kent quickly and easily puts the word into historical and cultural context, sometimes turning the most often used interpretation of the word upside down. Hence, the a-ha! And she does all of this with a friendly, non-intimidating, and engaging manner. One of the most powerful a-ha moments for me was the chapter on the word “love:” I’ve heard preachers and teachers outline the three concepts behind the biblical concept of love in the Greek language: eros (sexual or romantic love), phileo (brotherly love or tender friendship); and, agapeo or agape (spiritual, self-sacrificing love) and how all three biblical words were translated into English as “love.” It was a familiar concept so I wasn’t sure Kent could make this concept new for me. But of course she did, starting out with a nod to the Beatles All You Need is Love, and a caution that love is, in our culture, “a word often said but seldom understood, a word robbed of meaning, and yet one that can mean so many different things.” There is a quick and easy explanation of the meaning of each of the three love-words, and then the zinger, something I had never heard before (or if I had, I didn’t remember—sorry, Preachers!) In John 21, the resurrected Jesus talks to Peter, who is still ashamed of his public denial of being a Jesus-follower. “Peter, do you love me more than these?” Jesus asks, using the Greek agapeo. It’s a significant and loaded question. Jesus is asking Peter if he is willing to follow to the point of death. Guess what Peter answers? “Lord, you know that I love you.” In English, this seems a reasonable response. But Peter uses the Greek phileo instead of agapeo. Peter is making it clear that he loves Jesus as a friend or a brother, but cannot or will not yet commit to the highest form of love. Jesus has modeled it already to Peter and now he is calling Peter to it, but through shame, guilt, and/or pride, Peter stubbornly sticks to phileo. That’s not the end of the story for Peter and, in fact, when he is old he will surrender his will to his Lord and live out agapeo. But not yet. I never would have understood the subtext to the conversation without Keri’s clear and succinct explanation. Finally, I understood why Jesus kept repeating this question to Peter, even though Peter seemed to be satisfactorily answering Jesus. Deeper Into the Word is full of these moments, directing a bright and warm light onto familiar biblical words that can speak into our lives with power, if only we take the time to listen.

  • Sunflower
    2019-04-29 07:08

    "Deeper into the Word: Reflections on 100 Words From the New Testament" by Keri Wyatt Kent is a very basic bible reference tool that reflections on 100 topical words that can be found in the New Testament. An addition to Keri's other book,"Deeper into the Word: Reflections on 100 Words From the Old Testament", this is a handy, thinline book that focuses on a new look at important topical words that can be found in the New Testament and can be used either as part of a personal reflection tool or for a quick and easy reference tool.Going into such areas as to,"Why was this word chosen over that of another", "What is implied in the original language", and helping the bible reader understand, without knowing Greek, the deeper details of God's Word for oneself, this is really a very handy book to have in one's library.The details are essential one and half pages long, so this is not a deep study of a word's meaning,but enough overview for the layman, to either point them in the general direction of where to look, or provide a more, "touching the surface" insight into what certain words that are used in the Bible, may imply.If you are looking for a resource that will give you the general direction of what Greek word to look up or just a quick look on the surface of what say, the word, "Mercy" is being implied in God's word,"Deeper into the Word: Reflections on 100 Words From the New Testament" by Keri Wyatt Kent is a very valuable, to have on hand bible reference.This isn't for the "serious" study of the bible, but rather a quick, road map to make our Father's word, more enjoyable and enough to help one develop a richer and slower journey into the richness and understanding of God's word.Both books will be valuable assets to the library and this is something that even homeschoolers can use for either copywork, word lookup, or a way to even teach older children to young adults, the value of really understanding and exploring God's Word.Note, this is not just for that age group, but rather for anyone who is ready to be serious about going deeper in studying God's word and a great way to develop that either personal time study, maybe just have a quick "go to" reference or help with getting a general road map of where to start!

  • Debbie
    2019-05-18 07:14

    "Deeper into the Word" can be used as a devotional or a Bible reference tool. Each entry was about 2.25 pages long and read like a devotional, so I'd recommend using it like that. The author explored 101 English words/topics.The author took an English word and then explained which Greek words were usually translated as that English word. She explained the nuances of each Greek word and gave examples of where it was used in the New Testament. She also gave some cultural context for the word and an overview of what the New Testament (and, sometimes, the Old Testament) said about the topic. I was impressed by how well the author captured the tensions in Scripture. She also discussed how to apply what we learned about the word.The book was written for those who have never studied Greek but who want to dig deeper, and I'd highly recommend this book to that audience.The words studied: Afraid; Anoint; Apostle; Believe; Bless/Blessed/Blessing; Blind; Body; Bread; Break/Broken; Burden; Call/Called/Calling; Care; Chosen; Church; Clean/Cleanse; Compassion; Content/Contentment; Covenant; Cross; Daughter; Deacon; Death/Die; Disciple; Doubt; Eye/Eyes; Faith/Faithful; Father; Fellowship; Fill/Fulfill/Fullness; Fire; Forgive/Forgiven/Forgiveness; Free/Freedom; Friend; Fruit; Gift/Gifts; Good/Goodness; Gospel; Grace; Harvest; Holy Spirit; Hope; Humble; Hungry; Inheritance; Joy; Justify/Justification; Lamb; Light; Love; Mercy; Messiah; Miracle; New; One Another; Parable; Patience/Patient; Peace; Persecute/Persecution; Perseverance; Pharisee; Power; Pray; Preach; Prepare; Promise; Proud/Pride; Quiet; Reconciliation; Religion/Religious; Remain; Repent; Rest; Resurrection; Righteousness; Rock; Sabbath; Sacrifice; Salt; Salvation; Seek; Self-Control; Serve/Service; Sheep/Shepherd; Sin; Son of Man; Soul; Spirit; Strength; Temptation; Thirst/Thirsty; Truth; Understand; Vine/Vineyard; Water; Way; Wise/Wisdom; Witness; Wonder/Wonders; Word; Work/Works; Yoke.I received this book as a review copy from the publisher.

  • Dailycheapreads
    2019-04-21 02:05

    Ready to go deep into God's word?Deeper Into the Word is a very thorough, yet accessible, tool to look closely at the Scriptures and see what they mean - both to the original audience and for us today.Keri Wyatt Kent examines 100 words used in the New Testament, giving insight into each word's definition and usage in the original language, the cultural context of the time, and what it means for believers today. Each description is about two pages long. Reading this book was a bit like participating in a seminary lecture; while some portions were a bit technical, it opened up a deeper understanding to familiar passages of the Bible and gave them a richer meaning. Like a good professor, Kent mixed together personal insights with research, as in the chapter on sacrifice where she writes, "Jesus was, to put it in our vernacular, talking smack to the Pharisees."This book would be useful to students or any one in ministry. It is probably best adapted to ordinary students of the Bible who want to enhance their understanding. It can be used as a reference tool or read through from beginning to end.I received a copy of this book from Bethany House for review. You can buy it for your Kindle for $9.99.

  • Victor Gentile
    2019-05-03 03:48

    Keri Wyatt Kent in her new book, "Deeper Into The Word: New Testament" published by Bethany House Publishers gives us a study into a hundred words used in the New Testament.What is the difference between a jail and prison? Well a quick look through the Dictionary will answer that question. But that is the way it is with words sometimes we do not understand the depth of meaning and we use words that seem correct to us but really are not the proper fit. That is not the way, however, with the New Testament writers. When they used a word they were very precise in its meaning. After all they were trying to make the Word Of God clear for all of us and they were using the Greek language.Not only does Keri Wyatt Kent give us the English word but she also gives us the Greek word that the writer was using and its variations. This is more than a Bible devotional, which it is, we can use it as a desktop reference tool anytime we want to deeper analyze a word. I know that "Deeper Into The Word: New Testament" is going right up there on my bookshelf next to my Bible for continued use. I can only hope for more in this series and then in the Old Testament as well.If you would like to listen to interviews with other authors and professionals please go to www.kingdomhighlights.org where they are available On Demand.To listen to 24 Christian music please visit our internet radio station www.kingdomairwaves.orgDisclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from Bethany House Publishers. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  • Susan
    2019-05-10 01:09

    Ready to go deep into God's word?Deeper Into the Word is a very thorough, yet accessible, tool to look closely at the Scriptures and see what they mean - both to the original audience and for us today.Keri Wyatt Kent examines 100 words used in the New Testament, giving insight into each word's definition and usage in the original language, the cultural context of the time, and what it means for believers today. Each description is about two pages long. Reading this book was a bit like participating in a seminary lecture; while some portions were a bit technical, it opened up a deeper understanding to familiar passages of the Bible and gave them a richer meaning. Like a good professor, Kent mixed together personal insights with research, as in the chapter on sacrifice where she writes, "Jesus was, to put it in our vernacular, talking smack to the Pharisees."This book would be useful to students or any one in ministry. It is probably best adapted to ordinary students of the Bible who want to enhance their understanding. It can be used as a reference tool or read through from beginning to end.I received a copy of this book from Bethany House for review.

  • Pamela (Lavish Bookshelf)
    2019-05-17 02:08

    As a reader and a wannabe writer, I really appreciated this book about words. I personally find it fascinating to know the history of a common word or perhaps learn of an alternative translation for a familiar phrase.Deeper into the Word by Keri Wyatt Kent is a reference book, organized in alphabetical order like a in-depth concordance in the Bible. This book lays out the history and Biblical significance of 101 words, ranging from afraid to yoke, with words like fire and rest found in between.This book could also be used as a daily devotional, sort of. The chapters are short and the topics are easy to understand. It is a bit difficult to use this book as a devotional though, because the alphabetical nature of the book made the topics on a day-to-day basis a bit random.What impressed me most was the amount of research that is included in this book. Greek roots, Hebrew history, Biblical culture lessons are all in there. And yet even with all the research contain in the book, Keri Wyatt Kent has also included an Appendix of Helpful Websites. Keri Wyatt Kent makes no claims to be a learned Biblical scholar. It's clear she wrote this book for average readers to learn more about the Bible and how the Bible relates to Christian living. And as an average reader hoping to learn more about the words behind the Word, I will be keeping and referring to my copy of Deeper into the Word by Keri Wyatt Kent.My source: I received this book complimentary from Bethany House in exchange for an honest review but the opinion is all mine.

  • Donna
    2019-05-08 03:01

    Studying the Bible is meant to instruct us, to uplift us, to bring us closer to God, and to make us want more. Word studies is just one of the wonderful ways we can study the Bible, a way to find a fuller, richer meaning to Scripture passages. "Deeper Into the Word" gives us information on 100 words from the New Testament. Words such as: rest, hungry, care, pray, remain, and chosen are given special treatment by Keri Kent as she gives us Scripture references, Greek meanings, and cross-references as needed; even treating us to thoughts from other people and commentaries. Each word study gives enough to enlighten the reader and encourage him/her to delve deeper. Each word study is relatively short, very easy to read and understand, and well worth sharing with others.I have enjoyed reading this book and learning more about these special New Testament words. It has spurred me to get back into word studies for my personal devotions. This book is great for personal or group Bible study, and will make a wonderful gift for Bible lovers. Many thanks to Bethany House for the opportunity to read and review this wonderful book.

  • Mark Jr.
    2019-04-23 04:59

    This book is well-meaning but methodologically unsound. The chapter on love, for example, repeats in short space many of the standard exegetical and theological errors D.A. Carson exposes in The Difficult Doctrine of the Love of God. Read that book instead. And, if you're up for a challenge, read Moisés Silva's Biblical Words and Their Meaning.Her footnotes are full of what Silva calls "theological lexicography": Spicq, Vine, Zodhiates, Renn. In her acknowledgments she says that "Dr. Scot McKnight challenged me to make this book academically accurate and recommended resources to help me do that." I don't say this with any meanness in my heart, but I don't think she really grasped the resources McKnight recommended.It does matter what you read. There are many more reliable voices out there. Start with Carson. The book I mentioned is very readable.

  • Claire
    2019-05-04 07:05

    This is a book I'll be reading and re-reading for a long time. I keep it with my Bible, for reference to enhance my reading. Keri Wyatt Kent has done extensive research on the historical context and biblical scholars' perspectives, and translated that into current language that enlightens my understanding. One of the first days I used it, I read a passage, then selected one of the words to study from Kent's book, then re-read the passage. I felt enriched by the deeper study. It truly took me "Deeper Into the Word" and for that I am truly grateful. As stated, this will be read and used for years to come.

  • Cindy
    2019-05-01 00:48

    I am pulling this review out and posting it again, because I found that I hadn't originally submitted it to the sites needed. Very interesting concept. 100 Words from the NT, with their original Greek words and meanings. What a great idea. I did find it interesting the words that were picked to explore. The suggested usage of this book is with your regular Bible study, but I can see using it as a reference for topical studies also. A great resource to have on hand, a keeper for my book shelves. 4 stars from this reviewer.

  • Theresa
    2019-05-07 01:10

    In this book, the author, Keri Wyatt Kent, took me on a journey, deeper into the Bible. Kent takes 100 of the most poignant words in the Bible and provides fascinating commentary, history, and context for each one. Quite an eye-opener.

  • Lillie
    2019-05-09 23:48

    The book is a mini-word study of 100 words the author considers among the most important words used in the New Testament. It can be used as a devotional or as a reference in looking up the Greek root and the meanings and usages of the words.